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      feast
      fi:st
      n[C] banquet ¶ festival ¶ a collection of sth to be enjoyed
      v[I] eat and drink a lot with great enjoyment
      -
      Why did the pilgrims want to hold a Thanksgiving feast?
      After the feast had ended, Nahad called his daughter to him.
      Passover was called the feast of unleavened bread in the Torah or Old Testament.
      The whole movie is a visual feast.
      We feasted on fresh Dingwall mussels for lunch, and in the afternoon the skies opened up.
      If you hadn't just had a baby with my best friend, I swear to Lucifer, a rabid dog would be feasting on your danglers right now!
      Feast your eyes on the sweeping landscapes of Zimbabwe, absorb the cultural delights of China and immerse yourself in exotic Thai culture.
      If that's not enough to feast your eyes on, there's also water views and 830,000 square feet of gated, secure private island for the kids to play on.
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      crust
      krʌst
      n[UC] the hard brown outer surface of bread ¶ bread foundation of pizza ¶ a thin hard dry layer on the surface of sth
      -
      Bake 8 to 12 minutes longer or until crust is golden brown.
      It was the thinnest crust pizza I have ever had in my life.
      Always make deep slits in the top crust of fruit pie.
      From the saline exhalation of the Dead Sea, objects near it are quickly covered with a crust of salt.
      The upper crust are the upper classes.
      Park Avenue, the film says, "is where the upper crust, the ultra rich live."
      In geology, the crust is the outermost solid shell of a rocky planet or natural satellite, which is chemically distinct from the underlying mantle.
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      in`voke
      in'vəuk
      v[T] call on God, demon etc for help etc ¶ appeal to an outside authority etc for confirmation etc ¶ put a law etc into use ¶ evoke
      -
      The sacred dance is performed to invoke ancient gods.
      Invoking various spirits can give great power to any magical rite or personal transformation ritual.
      Obama invoked Jesus when he came out in support of same-sex marriage.
      I invoked the help of a passing cyclist and he mended my bike tire with his patch kit.
      If a minor child can invoke the Florida Constitution to affirm her individual rights in these cases, then surely a minor child has the right to assert a constitutional privilege to resist an attempt to remove her from the only home she has known.
      French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius invoked this provision in mid June 13 when he said France would push the UN Security Council to enforce Kofi Annan's peace plan and ceasefire.
      The UN threatened to invoke economic sanctions if the talks were broken off.
      If you invoke something such as a principle, a saying, or a famous person, you refer to them in order to support your argument.
      It was invoked twice more at crucial junctures in the rest of the text and appeared frequently in other congressional papers after July 4, 1776.
      Go to your start menu and invoke (activate or start a "program") Forgiveness. Do this as many times as necessary until Grudge, Resentment and Anger have completely erased.
      If something such as a piece of music invokes a feeling or an image, it causes someone to have the feeling or to see the image. Many people consider this use to be incorrect.
      It was powerful and it invoked emotion.
      It even invokes unpleasant memories.
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      ce`ment
      si'ment
      n[U] a grey powder used in building ¶ a substance which sticks things together
      also a verb
      -
      An early version of cement made with lime, sand, and gravel was used in Mesopotamia in the third millennium B.C. and later in Egypt.
      The need for a fast set time encouraged the development of new cements. Most famous was Parker's "Roman cement".
      Roman cement quickly became popular but was largely replaced by Portland cement in the 1850s.
      Portland cement is by far the most common type of cement in general use around the world.
      Portland cement is made by heating limestone (calcium carbonate) with small quantities of other materials (such as clay) to 1450 °C in a kiln.
      Cement powder causes allergic reactions at skin contact and biohazardous to skin, eyes and lungs, so handlers should wear a dust mask, goggles and protective gloves.
      Concrete is a composite material made by mixing cement with sand, gravel etc and water.
      A concrete mixer (also commonly called a cement mixer) is a device that homogeneously combines cement, aggregate such as sand or gravel, and water to form concrete.
      A typical concrete mixer uses a revolving drum to mix the components.
      Dental cements are hard, brittle materials formed by mixing powder and liquid together
      How to fix an outside faucet that is cemented in brick?
      She lit the candle and cemented it to the trunk with its wax.
      If you cement something, you make it stronger.
      It cemented Will Smith's position as a box office champion.
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      re`hears`al
      ri'hə:səl
      n[CU] an occasion when people practice for an event or the performance of a play etc
      -
      A rehearsal dinner is a pre-wedding ceremony in Western tradition, usually held after the wedding rehearsal and the night before the wedding ceremony.
      Miss Waltham is at the rehearsal dinner.
      "I need you at the rehearsal dinner tonight at 1800 hours," said Monica.
      A dress rehearsal is a full-scale rehearsal where performers work out every detail of the performance. For theatre, cast members wear their costumes, and the backdrop may be used with props.
      We don't have time for (a) rehearsal before the performance.
      "I stayed home from work today while you were at rehearsal so somebody could be here with our chick!" Chandler complained.
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      com`pli`ment
      'kɔmplimənt
      v[T] say sth nice to sb
      n[C] the expression or action
      n[pl] praise or good wishes, greetings
      -
      "So when people compliment me on my cooking tonight, what do I say?" Richard asked.
      "Could you also please tell Sergei that I really like his suit," said Phoebe. Mischa did so, and Sergei complimented Phoebe.
      Howard paid Missy extravagant compliments.
      He paid Missy the finest compliment of all by doing magic tricks.
      To Howard the greatest compliment was to be considered amusing.
      "What a great compliment to logic!" said Leonard, raising his sarcasm sign.
      If you fish for compliments, you try to make someone say something nice about you.
      Loved it so much that on our last day we went through to the kitchen to give compliments to the chef.
      Two lucky people will receive this gift with our compliments. Prizes will be drawn by an independent person.
      The response to a request for a product catalogue or a price list may simply be the price list or catalogue, with a compliments slip attached, rather than with a formal letter of reply.
      If you say that someone returns the compliment, you mean that they do the same thing to someone else as that person has done to them.
      They didn't take a lot of notice of me, and I returned the compliment.
      A backhanded compliment, also known as a left handed compliment or asteism, is an insult that is disguised as a compliment. "You're very smart for a woman." is an example.
      In some cultures, backhanded compliments are considered a genteel or polite way of expressing disdain.
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      as`tro`naut
      'æstrənɔ:t
      n[C] sb who travels and works in a spacecraft
      -
      An astronaut or cosmonaut is a person trained by a human spaceflight program to command, pilot, or serve as a crew member of a spacecraft.
      A cosmonaut is an astronaut from the former Soviet Union.
      In English-speaking nations, a professional space traveler is called an astronaut. The term derives from the Greek words meaning "star" and "sailor".
      On 15 October 2003, Yang Liwei became China's first astronaut on the Shenzhou 5 spacecraft.
      The term taikonaut is used by some English-language news media organizations for professional space travelers from China. The word has featured in the Longman and Oxford English dictionaries, the latter of which describes it as "a hybrid of the Chinese term taikong (space) and the Greek naut (sailor)".
      In the United States, professional, military, and commercial astronauts who travel above an altitude of 50 miles (80 km) are awarded astronaut wings.
      Neil Alden Armstrong was an American astronaut and the first person to walk on the Moon.
      Just think, thanks to your hard work, an international crew of astronauts will boldly go where no man has gone before.
      Let me explain what we're doing here. Um, in 1969, the astronauts on Apollo 11 positioned reflectors on the surface of the moon, and we're gonna shoot a laser off one of them and let the light bounce back into this photomultiplier.
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      lit`ter
      'litə
      n[U] small pieces of garbage that have been left in public places ¶ a messy pile of things ¶ a substance that is put in a container to be used as a toilet by pets ¶ straw etc that animals sleep on
      n[C] a group of animals that are born at the same time
      v[IT] spread across a place untidily ¶ has or contains a lot of sth
      -
      If you drop litter in class, or in the playground, the school can punish you by making you clean up the classroom, or collect rubbish.
      A litter of notes and papers were strewn on Sherlock's desk.
      You know you could totally sell this. It'd be perfect for like a kitty litter campaign.
      Litter is straw or other material strewn in an animal's enclosure (e.g. a stable) for it to sleep on and to absorb its feces and urine.
      There was a litter of puppies that needed homes.
      Litterfall, plant litter, leaf litter, tree litter, soil litter, or duff, is dead plant material, such as leaves, bark, needles, and twigs, that has fallen to the ground.
      The litter is a class of wheelless vehicles, a type of human-powered transport, for the transport of persons.
      A sign at a highway in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, reads "NO LITTERING, FINES TO $10,000".
      My desk is covered (some would say littered) with in-progress designs.
      Look at the Forbes richest in the world and it is littered with people taking up citizenship elsewhere.
      Charles' speech is littered with lots of marketing buzzwords like 'cloud' and 'computing'.
      If an animal such as a dog or cat litters, it gives birth to babies.
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      bar`be`cue
      'ba:bikju:
      v[T] cook food on a metal frame over a fire outdoors
      n[C] the cooking apparatus, meal, or party
      -
      Here's a way of barbecuing corn-on-the-cob that I learned in the States.
      The generally accepted difference between barbecue and grilling is in the cooking time and type of heat used: grilling is generally done "hot and fast" over direct heat from low-smoke fuels (with the flame contacting the meat itself), while barbecuing is usually done "low and slow" over indirect heat from high-smoke fuels (with the flame not contacting the meat directly).
      The term as a noun can refer to the meat or to the cooking apparatus itself (the "barbecue grill" or simply "barbecue").
      The word barbecue is also used to refer to a social gathering where food is served, usually outdoors in the late afternoon or evening.
      The term barbecue is also used to designate a flavor added to foodstuffs, the most prominent of which are potato chips.
      Owing to their small size, hibachi grills are popular as a form of portable barbecue.
      This (SCARLETT AT THE BARBEQUE) is a wonderful print by Jeffery Barson of Scarlett in one of her loveliest frocks, a true picture of a beauty of the South.
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      sym`pa`thet`ic
      simpə'θetik
      adj caring and feeling sorry about sb's problems ¶ supporting a plan, action, or person
      -
      "Since the divorce, when anybody asks me how I am, it's always with a sympathetic head tilt," said Dr. Burke.
      Sometimes a friendly face and a sympathetic ear for a reasonable amount of time can really boost the spirits.
      Many Syrians who have been perceived as being sympathetic to the regime have been kidnapped or assassinated by rebel.
      There isn't a mother alive who isn't sympathetic to the idea of worrying about what we put in our kid's bodies.
      What role does "a sympathetic (providing the right conditions) environment" play in enabling the individual to create himself or herself?
      In the pre-Christian era, as the winter solstice approached and the plants died, pagans brought evergreen boughs in their homes as an act of sympathetic magic intended to guard the life essences of the plants until spring.
      Oh, no worries, I explained my predicament to our letter carrier. He was sympathetic. His exact words were, Got your back, Jack.
      A sympathetic character in a movie, book, etc. is easy to like. This meaning is not very common and you should use likeable or pleasant instead.
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      groan
      grəun
      v[I] voice a deep, not clear sound, as of pain, pleasure etc ¶ make a sound expressing stress or strain
      n[C] the sound
      v[T] utter or express with ~
      -
      He fainted from the heat and crashed through the ceiling, landing face down on the hardwood floor, groaning with pain.
      We all moaned and groaned when we were told that our flight left at something like 5:30AM.
      I groan, feeling the sweet sensation all the way to my groin.
      If wood or something made of wood groans, it makes a loud sound when it moves or is under pressure.
      Black Pearl's timbers groaned during the storm.
      The shelves of bookshops are groaning under the weight of a huge number of business books.
      If you say that someone or something is groaning under the weight of something, you think there is too much of that thing.
      Many homeowners are groaning under the weight of multiple mortgages.
      Had you seen that field of carnage, heard the groans of wounded men?
      All I hear are the groans of a dying Rome.
      If you groan something, you say it in a low, unhappy voice.
      "Hell, Ana, I just showed you," he groans.
      If you groan about something, you complain about it.
      Everyone was moaning and groaning about how tough it was.
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      or`tho`dox
      'ɔ:θədɔks
      adj conventional ¶ following closely the traditional beliefs and practices of a religion ¶ following generally accepted beliefs
      -
      With orthodox medical facilities largely inaccessible to the rural communities, herbal or traditional healers are the main providers of health care.
      He challenged the orthodox views on porn.
      Howard Wolowitz is not an orthodox Jew.
      Orthodox Christianity is a collective term for the Eastern Orthodox Church and Oriental Orthodoxy. These two branches of Christianity use the term "orthdoxy" (from Greek: orthos + doxa, meaning correct belief) to express their belief to have an unbroken connection to the faith, doctrine and practices of the ancient Christian church.
      The adjectives "Eastern" and "Oriental" are used by outsiders to differentiate the two groups; their adherents call themselves simply "Orthodox Christians".
      "Are they Greek Orthodox?" "Yeah. They're my friends, Monica Stephanopolus and Chandler Acidofolus."
      His book stirred huge debate, being fiercely attacked by orthodox Marxists and neo-conservatives.
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      fling
      fliŋ
      n[C] a short and not very serious sexual relationship ¶ a short period of enjoyment
      v[T] throw
      -
      Isn't that supposed to be fling? Shouldn't it be flung by now?
      I was supporting the band on the tour. It was called 'The Final Fling' because Stuart wanted a break from Big Country.
      If you fling something somewhere, you throw it there using a lot of force.
      Michael Scofield flung his hard drive into the Chicago River below.
      If you fling yourself somewhere, you move or jump there suddenly and with a lot of force.
      She stopped, choking with sobs, and, overcome by emotion, flung herself face downward on the bed, sobbing in the quilt.
      If you fling a part of your body in a particular direction, especially your arms or head, you move it there suddenly.
      She saw him coming, ran out, and flung her arms round his neck.
      If you fling yourself at someone, you move suddenly towards them in order to attack them or hold them.
      "Please, we beg you!" He flung himself at Arthur's feet again.
      If you fling yourself into a particular activity, you do it with a lot of enthusiasm and energy.
      Monica flung herself into organizing Phoebe's wedding again.
      That does lead to quite a few rows and insults being flung back and forth.
      Joey flung open the fridge door.
      Kesey was eventually busted and flung into jail.
      Phoebe flung off (tore off) her overcoat and attended to the sick man.
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      up`hold
      ʌp'həuld
      v[T] support or maintain
      -
      Spain, with a large number of Catholics, firmly upheld its gay marriage laws.
      The Quebec Court of Appeal unanimously upheld the acquittal.
      We, the judges have taken oath to uphold the rights of people.
      The government is duty-bound to promote, protect and uphold the rights of their citizens.
      The nation is determined to uphold its freedom at any cost.
      We also have failed to uphold our traditional culture in the electronic media world with positive manners.
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      sta`bil`ize
      'steibilaiz
      v[IT] become firm, steady, or unchanging, or make sth do this
      -
      "I'm here to stabilize things," said Mr. Mahoney, who rejoined the automaker from Porsche last summer.
      He proposes to stabilize federal spending at a new and much higher level.
      They could be in a rent stabilized unit, or CNBC can be footing their rent, which often happens when big companies bring employees to New York.
      If Bitcoin stabilizes and grows in popularity, it will become an increasingly useful tool for various illegal activities beyond the cyber realm.
      One minute later, it reached 108,000 feet, eventually stabilizing at a ceiling of 120,000 feet.
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      dis`place
      dis'pleis
      v[T] replace ¶ force sb/sth out of its usual or original position
      -
      But the firm has grown far less than he predicted, partly as technology displaced thousands of equities traders.
      These lighter weight technologies leverage rather than displace corporate information and systems.
      In late April, the government packed more than 100,000 displaced Afghans onto buses and sent them back across the border.
      Although the war officially ended in 2003, violence continues to displace tens of thousands in the remote east.
      Finding housing for Staten Islanders displaced by Hurricane Sandy will be a top priority for the federal government, U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said during a visit to storm-ravaged Midland Beach Sunday afternoon.
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      groom
      gru:m
      v[T] clean or brush an animal ¶ prepare or train sb for an important job or position
      n[C] sb who takes care of horses
      -
      Having a dog at home also means lot of responsibility. You need to groom your dog and the training should start from the very first day you get them home.
      If an animal grooms itself or another animal, it cleans itself or another animal.
      Long-haired dogs need a lot of grooming.
      To groom means to take care of your own appearance by keeping your hair and clothes clean and tidy.
      A well-groomed person or animal has a clean and neat appearance.
      If you are groomed for a special job, someone prepares you for it by teaching you the skills you will need.
      He's being groomed to take over as CFO.
      He succeeded Newman as Editor partly because the person groomed for the job, features editor Jack White, left the newspaper to join the new RT television service.
      A bridegroom (sometimes shortened to groom) is a man who will soon or has recently been married.
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      har`dy
      'ha:di
      adj tough, robust
      -
      Rats are hardy little creatures.
      Bretons are typical, hardy people of the sea, of the Atlantic.
      A hardy plant is able to live through the winter.
      Hardy annual plants can handle a slight freeze and are good choices for early fall and late spring planting.
      It is unlikely they will be hardy enough to cope with our climate.
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      verse
      və:s
      n[CU] poetry ¶ one of the parts into which a poem, song etc is divided
      -
      Verse is an occasional synonym for poetry.
      Blank verse is a type of poetry having regular meter but no rhyme.
      Free verse is a type of poetry written without the use of strict meter or rhyme, but is still recognized as poetry.
      A verse is formally a single metrical line in a poetic composition.
      However, verse has come to represent any division or grouping of words in a poetic composition, with groupings traditionally having been referred to as stanzas.
      I quote below a verse from the Bible to support the above.
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      sob
      sɔb
      v[I] cry noisily while taking short breaths
      v[T] say sth while ~
      also a noun
      -
      I was so upset I walked around for an hour sobbing so hard some guy pulled over to ask if I needed help.
      "It's been so long, but I found you," she sobbed.
      As I drive away, my chest constricts, my tears start to fall, and I choke back a sob.
      My voice is more a choked, strangled sob.
      It ain't the usual sort of sob-story that you hear every day.
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      pre`ci`sion
      pri'siʒən
      n[U] the quality of being exact, accurate and careful
      -
      Timekeeping is the science of how to keep time with precision and accuracy.
      With a sort of military precision that astonished him, she outlined the route that he was to follow.
      Precision engineering is a subdiscipline of electrical engineering, software engineering, electronics engineering, mechanical engineering, and optical engineering concerned with designing machines, fixtures, and other structures that have exceptionally low tolerances, are repeatable, and are stable over time.
      This is a precision tool designed to help you find the best waves each time you go surfing.
      Those aircraft cannot do precision bombing in a dangerous close situation.
      Mr. Li received a bachelor's degree in precision instrument from Shenzhen University in 1991, and a master's degree in business administration from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in 1999.
      It is impossible to predict the course of an epidemic with any degree of precision during its earliest stages.
      You might not get exact pixel perfection, but most site designs can handle that quite nicely and do not require surgical precision in terms of layout.
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      com`po`site
      'kɔmpəzit
      adj made up of different parts or materials
      also a noun
      -
      A composite number is a positive integer that has at least one positive divisor other than one or the number itself.
      In other words, a composite number is any integer greater than one that is not a prime number.
      Following is a list of the average composite scores that typically are accepted at colleges or universities.
      In other words, a composite number is any positive integer greater than one that is not a prime number.
      Composite materials are generally used for buildings, bridges and structures such as boat hulls, swimming pool panels, race car bodies, shower stalls, bathtubs, storage tanks, imitation granite and cultured marble sinks and counter tops.
      Composite armor is a type of vehicle armor consisting of layers of different material such as metals, plastics, ceramics or air.
      Composite video (1 channel) is an analog video transmission (no audio) that carries standard definition video typically at 480i or 576i resolution.
      Dental composite resins are types of synthetic resins which are used in dentistry as restorative material or adhesives.
      Composite portraiture (also known as composite photographs) is a technique invented by Sir Francis Galton in the 1880s after a suggestion by Herbert Spencer for registering photographs of human faces on the two eyes to create an "average" photograph of all those in the photographed group.
      A facial composite or an Identikit is a graphical representation of an eyewitness's memory of a face, as recorded by a composite artist.
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      cir`cu`la`tion
      sə:kju'leiʃən
      n[UC] the movement of blood around the body ¶ the movement of liquid, air etc in a system ¶ the passing or spreading of sth from one person or place to another
      -
      William Harvey, an English physician, was the first to describe completely and in detail the systemic circulation and properties of blood being pumped to the brain and body by the heart, though earlier writers had provided precursors of the theory.
      In the field of architecture, circulation refers to the way people move through and interact with a building.
      Atmospheric circulation is the large-scale movement of air, and the means (together with the smaller ocean circulation) by which thermal energy is distributed on the surface of the Earth.
      Newspaper circulation is the average number of copies of a newspaper distributed on a day.
      Magazine circulation is the average number of copies of a periodical distributed per edition/ volume.
      Fake antivirus software has been in circulation for a while.
      They pocket billions of dollars in profits that are taken out of circulation which in turn hurts all of us.
      Ceasing production of the penny and withdrawing existing pennies from circulation will have significant environmental benefits.
      Tom writes for the newspaper The Eagle. It has a daily circulation of one million.
      She's been ill but now she's back in circulation (social activities).
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      sil`i`con
      'silikən
      n[U] an chemical element that is found in sand
      -
      Silicon is a chemical element with the symbol Si and atomic number 14.
      Silicon is the eighth most common element in the universe by mass, but very rarely occurs as the pure free element in nature.
      In common integrated circuits, a wafer of monocrystalline silicon serves as a mechanical support for the circuits, which are created by doping, and insulated from each other by thin layers of silicon oxide, an insulator which is easily produced by exposing the element to oxygen under the proper conditions.
      Silicon Valley is the southern region of the San Francisco Bay Area in Northern California, in the United States. The region, whose name derives from the Santa Clara Valley in which it is centered, is home to many of the world's largest technology corporations as well as thousands of small startups.
      The term originally referred to the region's large number of silicon chip innovators and manufacturers, but eventually came to refer to all the high-tech businesses in the area, and is now generally used as a metonym for the American high-tech sector.
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      prim`i`tive
      'primitiv
      adj belonging to an early stage in the development of humans, animals, or plants ¶ very simple ¶ primal
      -
      A miracle of time, primitive life-forms still exist in the globe's hot springs.
      The eyes of the more primitive creatures, such as reptiles and birds, are very noticeably different from ours.
      It is true that primitive man is powerless against some of the things that threaten him.
      The festivals, which got started in the primitive society centreing on the prayer for food, have now been filled with various colours and varieties.
      In older anthropology texts and discussions, the term "primitive culture" refers to a society believed to lack cultural, technological, or economic sophistication or development.
      It's a lovely and unique, rustic lodge with very primitive cabins, firmly anchored to the seashore not far from where we live.
      In computing, language primitives are the simplest elements available in a programming language.
      While many naïve artists appear, from their works, to have little or no formal art training, this is often not true. The words "naïve" and "primitive" are regarded as pejoratives and are, therefore, avoided by many.
      The burying of the dead is a primitive instinct. Chimpanzees, elephants, and ants have been known to bury their dead.
      The primitive desire for prominence is actually symbolized in sports. When our team wins, we experience sort of dominance within the opponents as well as their fans.
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