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      out`right
      'autrait
      adj clear and direct ¶ complete and total
      adv clearly and directly ¶ completely or immediately
      -
      Outright Lies would be a more accurate description.
      That's not the same as an outright ban.
      The election failed to deliver her an outright majority.
      The penalty for outright fraud, such as false valuation, can be the entire value of the shipment or seizure of the shipment.
      Israel will outright reject the claim.
      Owning your own home outright is ideal, but most of us aren't able to do that.
      Men don't outright say women can't be in this profession.
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      wear`y
      'wiəri
      adj tired or bored ¶ very tiring
      v[IT] become ~, or make sb do this
      -
      Experts grew weary of explaining to students and newspaper reporters that the scenarios were sheer fantasy.
      In memory's eye I could see those staggering columns of the First World War, bending under soggy packs on many a weary march, from dripping dusk to drizzling dawn.
      I, wearied and disappointed, went off in search of Martha.
      Five years later, we're frankly wearied by flag-waving, singing the national anthem and cheering Sir Paul McCartney.
      Wearied of life and suffering, he decided to ask Allah to let him die.
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      dis`man`tle
      dis'mæntl
      v[T] take apart sth to pieces ¶ gradually get rid of
      -
      Forrest did well in the army; for example, he set a new company record for dismantling and assembling his M14 rifle.
      The Ottoman Empire was also dismantled, and lands in the Middle East fell under the protection of victorious European states.
      TSA needs to be dismantled and replaced by an agency that understands airport security and the law.
      In a forthcoming book, psychologist Gene Heyman dismantles this time-honored assumption.
      A mantle of something is a layer of it covering a surface, for example a layer of snow on the ground.
      If Jill Goodacre offers you gum, you take it. If she offers you mangled animal carcass you take it.
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      in`quire
      in'kwaiə
      v[IT] ask sb for information
      -
      The inquired father denies that his son was gay and says he had a girlfriend.
      When a customer inquires about a single item, point out she can get that item plus a great deal more by purchasing your bundle.
      Make a telephone call to colleague in another department, inquiring whether you can bring the visitor to see him/her.
      "Do you come to these parties often?" inquired Penny of the girl beside her.
      "Excuse me, how can I get to the bus stop?" I inquired of a passer-by.
      If we believe we are right we don't feel the need to inquire further.
      In this case, call the police to inquire about the status of the vehicle.
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      vi`brant
      'vaibrənt
      adj lively, exciting ¶ (colors) bright and strong, brilliant
      -
      New York City is one of the most vibrant and diverse cities in the world.
      Once a fortified city, Old Montreal is today a safe and vibrant community of hotels, restaurants, boutiques, rich in 17th & 18th history and charm - truly unique in North America.
      Buoyed by a strong currency and a vibrant economy, outbound travel by Australians expanded 9.6% in 2011.
      From the ancient Greeks, Romans and Phoenicians to the Vandals, Byzantines and Normans, every ruling power has added its own little piece of history and culture to the mix, so that today Sicily has a unique and vibrant culture all of its own.
      With the use of different shapes and vibrant colors, she shares her artistic talents with the reader.
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      shriek
      ʃri:k
      v[IT] scream
      also a noun
      -
      Compare these words: scream, screech, shriek, squeak, squeal, and squawk.
      "Shielding your face and shrieking like a girl is not a backhand," said Chandler.
      "Rachel's pregnant," Monica shrieked.
      Hey! Don't make Monica squeak again!
      Mrs. Wolowitz, who, along with several other ladies, witnessed the accident, uttered a shriek of agony, which none who heard will ever forget.
      One day while playing outside, he leaped into the air with a shriek, holding his bare foot.
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      tel`e`com`mu`ni`ca`tion
      telikəmju:ni'keiʃən
      n[C] communication at a distance by technological means
      -
      Telecommunication is communication at a distance by technological means, particularly through electrical signals or electromagnetic waves. Due to the many different technologies involved, the word is often used in a plural form, as telecommunications.
      A revolution in wireless telecommunications began in the 1900s with pioneering developments in radio communications by Guglielmo Marconi.
      Given this growth, telecommunications play an increasingly important role in the world economy and the global telecommunications industry was about a $4.7 trillion sector in 2012.
      The service revenue of the global telecommunications industry was estimated to be $1.5 trillion in 2010, corresponding to 2.4% of the world’s gross domestic product (GDP).
      A basic telecommunication system consists of three primary units that are always present in some form: a transmitter, a transmission medium, and a receiver.
      MCI, Inc. was an American telecommunication corporation, currently a subsidiary of Verizon Communications.
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      quar`ter`ly
      'kwɔ:təli
      adj,adv done or produced four times a year
      n[C] periodical published ~
      -
      Yeah hold on, bimonthly is an ambiguous term. Do you mean move it every other month or twice a month?
      A quarter dollar, or quarter, is a U.S. coin worth 25 cents, or one quarter of a dollar.
      The calendar year can be divided into 4 quarters, often abbreviated Q1, Q2, Q3 and Q4.
      They receive comprehensive initial training, additional in-service training on a quarterly basis, and have regular contact with a Case Manager.
      Currently, JPMorgan pays a quarterly dividend of $0.30 per share, for an annual dividend yield of 2.9%.
      The Wealth Magazine came in March 2009 as a quarterly.
      Compare these words: daily, weekly, monthly, bimonthly, quarterly, biannually, semiannually, biennially, and annually.
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      appall
      ə'pɔ:l
      v[T] horrify, fill with dismay, shock deeply
      -
      Take the example of Hitler's invasion of the Soviet Union. His racist ethics appall us.
      It just appalls me that these politicians can take such delight in finding new ways to be as nasty as possible.
      I am appalled by this picture and even more so by your comments and support for this man's actions.
      People are still suffering greatly, living in appalling conditions while others are enjoying the luxuries of modern society 15 minutes away.
      Compare these words: appalling, disgusting, and outrageous.
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      pro`pel
      prə'pel
      v[T] move, drive, or push sb/sth forward
      -
      A propeller is a type of fan that transmits power by converting rotational motion into thrust.
      The twisted airfoil (aerofoil) shape of modern aircraft propellers was pioneered by the Wright brothers.
      While some earlier engineers had attempted to model air propellers on marine propellers, they realized that a propeller is essentially the same as a wing, and were able to use data from their earlier wind tunnel experiments on wings.
      When a defending player propels the puck out of his defending zone and the puck clearly rebounds off a defending player in the neutral zone back into the defending zone, all attacking players are eligible to play the puck.
      These are the things that propel more studies and research.
      Here are 5 ways to propel you back out of that ditch and onto the path to your passionate career.
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      men`ace
      'menəs
      n[CU] threat ¶ a threatening atmosphere, quality etc ¶ nuisance
      v[T] threaten
      -
      I see no difference between the Nazi menace of 1933-45 and the current state of Islam and its ambitions for the globe.
      Violent individuals will always be a menace to innocents.
      The place grows quiet, as he carries with him a strong air of menace.
      With this wide range of possibilities of injuring the knee, knee pain becomes a real menace especially to physically active people like those involved in any kind of sport.
      If someone asks another person for something with menaces, they use threats of violence to get what they want.
      Phoebe demanded money from Ross with menaces.
      This was a harsh "No Man's Land" of mud, barbed wire and shell craters, swept by enemy machine gun fire, and menaced by artillery and snipers.
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      el`e`va`tion
      eli'veiʃən
      n[CU] the height of a place above mean sea level ¶ the process of sb getting a higher rank ¶ an increase in the amount or level of sth ¶ a 3-dimensional object from the position of a horizontal plane beside an object
      -
      Elevation, or geometric height, is mainly used when referring to points on the Earth's surface, while altitude or geopotential height is used for points above the surface, such as an aircraft in flight or a spacecraft in orbit, and depth is used for points below the surface.
      Her elevation to the position of Youth and Sport Minister after the 2007 election victory made her Labor's youngest ever minister, at the age of 30 -- the previous record holder being Paul Keating at 31.
      It is common knowledge that excess salt and sodium causes hypertention or elevation of blood pressure.
      In other words, an elevation is a side-view as viewed from the front, back, left or right (and referred to as a front elevation, [left/ right] side elevation, and a rear elevation).
      In ballistics, the elevation is the angle between the horizontal plane and the direction of the barrel of a gun, mortar or heavy artillery.
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      grieve
      gri:v
      v[IT] feel very sad, or upset sb
      -
      "Where's Chandler?" "Oh, he needed some time to grieve."
      He is a wise man who does not grieve for the things which he has not, but rejoices for those which he has.
      I was grieved to hear of his death.
      As someone who is old enough to remember the Vietnam War it grieves me to see history repeating.
      Compare these words: grieve, lament, and mourn.
      Good grief! What a tragedy!
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      moist
      mɔist
      adj slightly wet, esp in a pleasant way
      -
      The leaves were moist and brushed across her breasts, leaving a cool trail.
      "This rich and moist chocolate cake is easy to bake and hard to resist," said Baker Ham, head baker of Momma's Little Bakery, Chicago, Illinois.
      Wow! My whole mouth just filled with saliva!
      I was strangely moved and my eyes became moist with tears.
      Remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an open container with a moist cloth.
      As the sky darkened, the moist air filled with swarms of mosquitoes, huge flying insects and the damp, putrid smell of the river.
      If the weather is humid/sticky, you feel uncomfortable because the air is very wet and usually hot.
      Even at dusk the air was still heavy (too warm and not at all fresh because there is no wind).
      If it is stuffy in a place, it is unpleasantly warm and there is not enough fresh air.
      "I need to borrow some moisturizer," said Joey.
      "I was just moistening the tip," said Ross, pulling the cigarette off his upper lip and handing it to Dr. Green.
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      boy`cott
      'bɔikɔt
      v[T] refuse to buy, use, or take part in sth as a protest
      also a noun
      -
      Charles Cunningham Boycott (12 March 1832 - 19 June 1897) was a British land agent whose ostracism by his local community in Ireland gave the English language the verb to boycott.
      In 1880, as part of its campaign for the Three Fs (fair rent, fixity of tenure and free sale), the Irish Land League under Charles Stewart Parnell and Michael Davitt withdrew the local labor required to harvest the crops on Lord Erne's estate and began a campaign of isolation against Boycott in the local community.
      The Jewish boycott of German goods refers to one of the international Jewish responses to the policies of the Nazis. The boycott started in March 1933 in both Europe and the US.
      The Nazi regime protested internationally and on April 1, 1933, organized a (one day) boycott of Jewish businesses in Germany, which was the first of official anti-Jewish acts by the German government.
      The Soviet Union has boycotted the meetings of the United Nations Security Council.
      The sandwich is considered to be the namesake of John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, because of the claim that he was the eponymous inventor of this food combination.
      The Wall Street Journal has described it as Britain's "biggest contribution to gastronomy".
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      con`ti`nu`i`ty
      kɔnti'nju:iti
      n[CU] the state of not stopping or not changing
      -
      The aim is to demonstrate, and explain, some of the continuities and discontinuities in ethical and political problems and their solutions over time and changing context.
      Separated bicycle facilities may provide two-way travel for cyclists on one side of a structure; however, the continuity of the path should be maintained and conflicts avoided.
      In mathematics, the terms continuity, continuous, and continuum are used in a variety of related ways.
      The question of continuity at x = -2 does not arise, since x = -2 is not in the domain of f.
      Continuity of Operations (COOP) is a United States federal government initiative, required by U.S. Presidential directive, to ensure that agencies are able to continue performance of essential functions under a broad range of circumstances.
      In fiction, continuity (also called time-scheme) is consistency of the characteristics of people, plot, objects, and places seen by the reader or viewer over some period of time.
      Continuity editing is the predominant style of film editing and video editing in the post-production process of filmmaking of narrative films and television programs. The purpose of continuity editing is to smooth over the inherent discontinuity of the editing process and to establish a logical coherence between shots.
      Continuity or presentation (or station break in the U.S.) is a term used in broadcasting to refer to announcements, messages and graphics played by the broadcaster between specific programmes. It typically includes programme schedules, announcement of the programme immediately following and trailers or descriptions of forthcoming programmes. Continuity can be spoken by an announcer or displayed in text over graphics.
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      tur`moil
      'tə:mɔil
      n[U] a state of anxiety, confusion, excitement, disorder, and uncertainty
      -
      This is what happened in the last stimulus effort. Besides from our point of view shares are already overpriced. The market will be helped by a relatively stable dollar due to the turmoil in Europe and Japan.
      Most people, even in the turmoil of divorce, want the best for their children.
      I don't want to see war but the Hamas seems intent on keeping the area in turmoil.
      Following their talks, the third between the leaders in the past month, it was also announced that Australia will provide a $1.5 billion loan facility to help Indonesia through the current financial turmoil.
      Compare these words: trauma, turmoil, tumult, and uproar.
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      spon`ta`ne`ous
      spɔn'teiniəs
      adj happening in a natural way without being planned or thought about ¶ doing things without planning them first
      -
      Last time I left a spontaneous message I ended up using the phrase "Yes indeedy-o."
      Maybe you were on the right track with this whole spontaneous thing.
      First of all, you wanna make it look spontaneous, right?
      "Shall I count down from three?" "No, I think it needs to be spontaneous."
      He's a passionate, spontaneous man.
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      mo`tif
      məu'ti:f
      n[C] a design or a pattern used as a decoration ¶ theme or idea that is repeated
      -
      In the textile arts, a motif (also called a block or square) is a smaller element in a much larger work.
      Mosaic is the art of creating images with an assemblage of small pieces of colored glass, stone, or other materials.
      In art, a motif is an element of a pattern, image or part of one, or theme.
      In narrative, a motif is any recurring element that has symbolic significance in a story.
      In music, "The motive is the smallest structural unit possessing thematic identity".
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      sove`reign
      'sɔvrən
      n[C] monarch
      adj having the highest power ¶ independent
      -
      I believe in a sovereign God.
      A monarch is the sovereign head of a state, officially outranking all other individuals in the realm.
      King Ludwig II ceased to be a sovereign ruler in 1866 after a war involving Austria, Prussia and Bavaria.
      To those who persist in stating that none of the finished product from the pipeline will be used in the US, it is important to remember that the US as a sovereign nation can alter its energy policy to utilize the finished product any way it wishes.
      The English gold sovereign was a gold coin of the Kingdom of England first issued in 1489 under King Henry VII.
      State sovereignty is sometimes viewed synonymously with independence, however, sovereignty can be transferred as a legal right whereas independence cannot.
      A state can achieve de facto independence long after acquiring sovereignty, such as in the case of Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam.
      Also a state may lose its independence temporarily while retaining its legal sovereignty as in the case of the illegal incorporation of the Baltic states by the Soviet Union between 1940 and 1991.
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      rite
      rait
      n[C] a solemn ceremony, esp a religious one
      -
      A rite or ritual is an established, ceremonial, usually religious, act.
      Rites in this sense fall into three major categories: rites of passage, communal rites (such as Mass), and rites of personal devotion (such as promises to wed someone).
      A rite of passage is a ritual event that marks a person's transition from one status to another (such as marriage, adoption, baptism, coming of age, graduation, or inauguration).
      Many anthropologists tried to find out the origin of circumcision. They had many different theories: it was a religious sacrifice, a rite of passage marking a boy's entrance into adulthood.
      The rituals, ceremonies and rites of passage are important aspects of sororities.
      The last rites are the last prayers and ministrations given to many Catholics when possible shortly before death.
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      ca`tas`tro`phe
      kə'tæstrəfi
      n[UC] disaster
      -
      Romney as president will be a catastrophe.
      Even without a catastrophe, the U.S. Department of Transportation estimates that by 2030, congestion will cost U.S. and Canadian industry $17.8 billion per year.
      I'm not worried about CO2; I think that the earth's carbon cycle can handle it without a climate catastrophe.
      The crisis has shown that under the present international monetary system the sum of each country's polices produces not just unwanted "spillovers", but a breakdown of financial institutions, monetary fragmentation, and economic catastrophe.
      Everyone thinks their tiny action cannot be significant, but multiplied up millions of times, the impact of all the little daily actions results in global catastrophe.
      The much smaller but still catastrophic 1906 San Francisco earthquake is included in the diagram below for perspective.
      A cataclysm is a large-scale disaster.
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      mes`sen`ger
      'mesindʒə
      n[C] carrying a message
      -
      A messenger bag (also called a courier bag) is a type of sack, usually made out of some kind of cloth (natural or synthetic), that is worn over one shoulder with a strap that goes across the chest resting the bag on the lower back.
      Don't blame the messenger for delivering the truth about this film's inconsistencies and flaws.
      A carrier pigeon or messenger pigeon is a homing pigeon that is used to carry messages.
      A chemical messenger, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, is a molecule used for cellular signaling.
      Compare these words: courier, herald, and messenger.
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      snort
      snɔ:t
      v[IT] breathe air in a noisy way out through the nose ¶ sniff drugs
      also a noun
      -
      Monica is taking a drink as Ross says that. She laughs and snorts her drink.
      She let out a snort of laughter.
      And Monica, with that snort when she laughs?
      Over time, snorting cocaine will seriously damage the cartilage in your nose that separates the nostrils.
      Compare these words: scoff, scorn, snarl, snore, and snort.
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      sag
      sæg
      v[I] droop ¶ become weaker or fewer, flag
      also a noun
      -
      When something sags, it hangs down loosely or sinks downwards in the middle.
      The branch sagged under the weight of the peaches.
      The shelf sagged under the weight of the heavy dictionaries.
      This old mattress is starting to sag in the middle.
      Your skin starts to sag as you get older.
      "Hey, don't you want a washboard stomach and rock hard pecs?" "No! I want a flabby gut and saggy man breasts!"
      The dollar held up well this morning but the yen sagged.
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      $