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      de`ter
      di'tə:
      v[T] discourage
      -
      The rain had not deterred us.
      Failure did not deter him from making another attempt.
      This additional cost deters many drivers from entering the CBD.
      Foils are the best insulation material for deterring and keeping rodents out.
      Although the air patrols over the ocean routes did much to deter the submarines, it was also essential to provide merchant ships with naval escorts.
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      gran`ite
      'grænit
      n[U] a very hard stone used in building
      -
      The word "granite" comes from the Latin granum, a grain, in reference to the coarse-grained structure of such a rock.
      Granite is a natural source of radiation, like most natural stones.
      In some areas granite is used for gravestones and memorials.
      Granite has been extensively used as flooring tiles in public and commercial buildings and monuments.
      We have a granite counter with a small chip. Is there a repair material that can fill the damage so that it won’t be noticeable?
      Graphite is made almost entirely of carbon atoms.
      Marble is a type of rock resulting from the metamorphism of limestone.
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      dis`pose
      di'spəuz
      v[T] arrange things or put them in in a suitable way
      phrv ~ of - deal with ¶ get rid of ¶ defeat or kill
      phrv ~ to/towards - make sb feel a particular way towards sb/sth
      -
      Chinese vases are disposed around the gallery.
      They also have snails, frogs, turtles and snakes, also alive and disposed in buckets, normally too small to store them in an acceptable condition.
      The Dubai Police said in a statement that they had disposed of the explosive device.
      A plant takes sun energy and disposes of oxygen.
      She seems favourably disposed towards the idea.
      Waste may be disposed of in different ways, including dumped into open air pits, injected underground into waste disposal wells, spread onto the land or roads, or sprayed into the air, depending on state or local laws.
      The king ruthlessly disposed of his uncle.
      Even those historians least favorably disposed towards Adolf Hitler, such as Joachim Fest, conceded that 'Hitler was a courageous and efficient soldier and was always a good comrade.'
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      bi`lat`er`al
      bai'lætərəl
      adj involving two groups or nations
      -
      Bilateral negotiations, meetings, or agreements, involve only the two groups or countries that are directly concerned.
      Obama stated, "We will not negotiate bilateral trade agreements that stop the government from protecting the environment, food safety, or the health of its citizens; give greater rights to foreign investors than to U.S. investors; or require the privatization of our vital public services."
      Unilateral economic sanctions in Iran are useless.
      There is a need for major additional multilateral finance to support mineral and energy exploration and development in developing countries.
      The wall is weak and requires lateral support.
      Full-size individual seats in the rear offer high levels of comfort and lateral support.
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      un`do
      ʌn'du:
      v[T] untie or unfasten ¶ cancel
      -
      Also, this amendment would undo an executive order conceived by President Bill Clinton and implemented by President George Bush.
      Bill's zipper has come undone again.
      It's used by Windows System Restore, which allows a user to undo changes made to the operating system and recover from system failures.
      Every gain on the wrong side undoes the effect of many conquests on the right.
      Harry undid his trousers, pulling his underpants off with them and tossing them onto a nearby chair.
      The screws can be undone by hand.
      Your shoe-laces were undone.
      Some of the damage may be undone if you do light or moderate physical activity at work.
      "A Woman Undone (defeated and without any hope for the future)", by Rachel Karen Green
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      yearn
      jə:n
      v[I] long, crave
      -
      Monica yearned for a child.
      She and Chandler were yearning to have a baby.
      Joey yearned to be a movie actor.
      Ross still yearned after Rachel, even after all these years.
      I do yearn for faster downloads.
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      re`peal
      ri'pi:l
      v[T] abolish, revoke
      also a noun
      -
      What if he becomes president and repeals Obamacare?
      Romney sticks to the Republican line that Obama's law must be repealed.
      Are you still confident that repealing Dodd-Frank is the right thing to do in the face of stories like this?
      Supporters of the repeal say it is an antiquated law that does not deter divorce.
      Oh, man, did the KISS Army repeal "don't ask, don't tell"?
      The KISS Army is the official fan club for the American rock band Kiss, as well as the unofficial name used to refer to Kiss fans in general.
      If a government or a group of people in power rescind a law or agreement, they officially withdraw it and state that it is no longer valid.
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      vol`a`tile
      'vɔlətl
      adj changing easily into vapor ¶ changing suddenly from one mood/interest to another ¶ likely to change quickly, unstable
      -
      A volatile liquid is one that evaporates or vaporizes quickly at room temperature.
      An essential oil is a concentrated hydrophobic liquid containing volatile aroma compounds from plants. Essential oils are also known as volatile oils or ethereal oils.
      As rebellious as he was brilliant, George Patton was the only general truly feared by the Nazis, yet his own volatile personality was the one enemy he could never defeat.
      Volatile memory or volatile storage, contrary to non-volatile memory, is computer memory that requires power to maintain the stored information; it retains its contents while powered, but when power is interrupted stored data is immediately lost.
      Syria and Lebanon makes the situation highly volatile.
      The oil market is highly volatile.
      The Consumer Price Index, the most widely used gauge of U.S. inflation, was unchanged last month, the Labor Department said. But the so called core CPI, which strips out volatile food and energy prices, climbed 0.3 percent after two consecutive flat readings.
      Someone or something that is inert does not move at all.
      An inert substance is one which does not react with other substances.
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      stur`dy
      'stə:di
      adj robust, solid ¶ physically strong and healthy ¶ determined, firm
      -
      Rosita, Joey's chair, wasn't very sturdy.
      Most bites occur on the ankle or lower leg, so wearing gaiters, thick socks and sturdy boots will help prevent snake bites.
      I am using a Nokia N8 now, so I have already expected the sturdy build quality of the E7.
      It came in a sturdy plastic box.
      I can't say enough about the merits of a sturdy tripod.
      Try panning with your subject, keeping your feet slightly apart, creating a sturdy base for you to shoot from.
      Playstation Vita features a five-inch, 960x544 resolution OLED screen, sleek and sturdy design and four to five hours of battery life for continuous play.
      The burglary was committed by two sturdy men covering their face.
      Its fossils were found in western North America which told us that it lived in the late Cretaceous Period. It had a thick, heavy body and four sturdy legs. It weighed as much as 31 metric tons and looked like a suspension bridge.
      Jobs left a wonderful legacy, built a sturdy foundation for which the next generation can come forward and run with it.
      The Spanish shot stopper has been the foundation on which Liverpool's sturdy defense has been built on for the last few years.
      Compare 'stocky' and 'sturdy'.
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      mil`lion`aire
      miljə'neə
      n[C] sb whose net worth or wealth is equal to or exceeds one million units of currency
      -
      "Monica's gonna marry Pete Becker, a millionaire!" Rachel announced.
      "Don't you see what this means? I can forget about that stupid movie. I'm gonna be a millionaire!" said Joey.
      The increasing number of millionaires is partially due to prevailing economics, especially inflation; as the individual value of each unit of currency decreases, achieving a million of these becomes easier.
      The purchasing power of a million US dollars in 1959 is equivalent to $8.09 million in 2014.
      Forty-seven percent of millionaires are business owners. Twenty-three percent of the world's millionaires got that way through paid work, consisting mostly of skilled professionals or managers.
      As the term implies, multimillionaire applies to those individuals residing in households with a net worth or wealth of two million or more units of currency.
      A billionaire is someone who has at least a thousand times a million dollars, euros, or the currency of the given country (i.e. $1,000,000,000).
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      twi`light
      'twailait
      n[U] faint light after sunset ¶ dusk
      -
      I couldn't see their faces clearly in the twilight.
      Her eyes glittered in the twilight.
      We were playing at twilight in the hayfield south of the house, chasing each other around the fragrant coils of new-cut hay.
      He's a man who is in the twilight of his years aiming for one more shot at glory before he passes into obscurity.
      A twilight state or a twilight zone is a situation of confusion or uncertainty, which seems to exist between two different states or categories.
      Phil Tomaselli's fascinating guide to over 200 years of British spies and spying takes the reader on a journey through the twilight (involving mystery, dishonesty etc) world of the secret intelligence organizations Britain has run.
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      mis`tress
      'mistris
      n[C] a woman aving a sexual relationship with a man who is not her husband ¶ a female teacher, owner, or master
      -
      The Prince had shocked society by living openly with his mistress.
      Ronni Rappelano was Joey's dad's mistress.
      Madame de Pompadour was trained from childhood to be a mistress, and learned her trade well.
      A schoolmistress is a woman who teaches in a school.
      Lizzie, fetch your mistress her shawl.
      If a woman is a mistress of something, she is in control of it, highly skilled at it etc.
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      so`ci`e`tal
      sə'saiətl
      adj relating to a society (FORMAL)
      -
      Almost everywhere you look, there are signs of societal decay.
      The real solution, then, seems to be a societal change.
      So, I think our societal problems are very deep rooted and have been in the making for decades, from past generations.
      He writes on political, economic and societal issues from an independent point of view.
      That's too bad. I was hoping you could be my plus-one at the Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies' symposium on the impact of current scientific research on societal interactions.
      I'm gonna publicly shame you, and then sit back as societal pressure compels you to modify your behavior.
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      fur`nish
      'fə:niʃ
      v[T] put furniture in ¶ supply/provide with
      -
      He bought a 3 bedroom apartment and furnished it.
      I suspect that when they're furnishing their houses, most people probably wouldn't give a second thought to spending $1,000 or more on a sofa that they probably won't be using for more than 1-2 hours a day.
      It offers comfortable and cozy furnished rooms equipped with all desirable amenities.
      The city furnishes all courtrooms, offices, facilities, and supplies for the operation of the court.
      The information furnished at this web site is from the Office of Professions' official database and is updated daily, Monday through Friday.
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      lu`cra`tive
      'lu:krətiv
      adj profitable
      -
      In this country, we want our children to grow up and have lucrative jobs.
      Dell recognized that selling low-margin hardware was simply much less lucrative than offering services.
      You might have to turn down lucrative roles, but a real actress has to be selective about creating her acting resume and must keep her future in mind.
      I don't work. When my fist child was born I left the workforce and a very lucrative position and I have never regretted it for a moment.
      Lucre means money or profit.
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      de`fin`i`tive
      di'finitiv
      adj better than all others ¶ final
      -
      This definitive work tells in a breathtaking 776 pages the complete history of the US 82nd paratroop division during the war years.
      "Lonely Planet: Moscow" is the definitive travel guide to Moscow.
      We don't have definitive proof the Iranians are constructing a nuclear bomb.
      But there would be "no definitive decision" today, he added.
      The definitive version of the text is ready to be published.
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      cab`bage
      'kæbidʒ
      n[CU] a large round vegetable with with white, green or purple leaves
      -
      Cabbage is closely related to other cole crops, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts.
      The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) reports that world production of cabbage and other brassicas for 2011 was almost 69 million metric tons (68 million long tons; 75 million short tons).
      Almost half of these crops were grown in China, where Chinese cabbage is the most popular Brassica vegetable.
      Cabbages are prepared in many different ways for eating. They can be pickled, fermented for dishes such as sauerkraut, steamed, stewed, sautéed, braised, or eaten raw.
      Cabbage is a good source of vitamin K, vitamin C and dietary fiber.
      Coleslaw is a salad consisting primarily of finely-shredded raw cabbage and dressed most commonly with a vinaigrette salad dressing.
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      mum`ble
      'mʌmbəl
      v[IT] mutter
      -
      "Sorry," I mumbled, choking on the words.
      "My first time with Carol was..." Ross mumbled the last part.
      "Baby, I missed you so much," he mumbled against my neck.
      Speak up! You're mumbling!
      Compare these words: mumble, muffle, murmur, and mutter.
      Compare these words: bumble, crumble, fumble, grumble, humble, jumble, mumble, rumble, stumble and tumble.
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      ore
      ɔ:
      n[UC] a type of rock that contains sufficient minerals
      -
      An ore is a type of rock that contains sufficient minerals with important elements including metals that can be economically extracted from the rock.
      The ores are extracted through mining; these are then refined (often via smelting) to extract the valuable element(s).
      Metal ores are generally oxides, sulfides, silicates, or "native" metals (such as native copper) that are not commonly concentrated in the Earth's crust, or "noble" metals (not usually forming compounds) such as gold.
      An ore deposit is an accumulation of ore.
      Ore Refineries are the main resource structures in Red Alert 3, and must be protected at all costs.
      The Slave Miners were mobile ore refineries used by Yuri during the Psychic Dominator Disaster.
      Compare awe and ore.
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      brace`let
      'breislit
      n[C] a piece of jewellery worn around the wrist or forearm
      -
      A bracelet is a loop of material, such as a strap or chain, which is intended to be worn around the wrist or forearm, without being attached to clothing.
      Joey opens the box and pulls out an incredibly gaudy gold bracelet.
      Chandler's so wearing that bracelet.
      Oh Pheebs, is that a new ankle bracelet?
      The Jewelry Store, Phoebe is busy trying on virtually everything in the store. She's got earrings, rings, bracelets, and enough necklaces to put Mr. T to shame on; "I'd also like to try on the tiara."
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      scarf
      ska:f
      n[C] a piece of fabric worn around the neck, or near the head or around the waist
      v[T] eat sth very quickly, scoff
      -
      Headscarves or head scarves are scarves covering most or all of the top of a woman's hair and her head.
      A feather boa is a fashion accessory that is usually worn wrapped around the neck like a scarf.
      A shawl is a simple item of clothing, loosely worn over the shoulders, upper body and arms, and sometimes also over the head.
      They look about them as Jamie removes her coat and scarf.
      Ross offers his hand, and Dr. Green puts his scarf on it.
      Rachel opens her present from Ross; it's a dark-red scarf.
      Gavin gives Rachel a green scarf.
      Ross scarfs all of his trifle down in about a second. He looks like he's going to throw up.
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      pro`ba`tion
      prə'beiʃən
      n[U] a system that allows some criminals not to go to prison if they behave well and see an ~ officer regularly ¶ a period of time during which a student must improve their work or behavior in order to stay in school ¶ a period of time during which an employer can see if a new worker is suitable
      -
      The judge sentenced Phoebe to two years' probation.
      She pleaded guilty and was placed on probation.
      A probation officer is a person whose job is to supervise and help people who have committed crimes and been put on probation.
      A probationer is someone who has been found guilty of committing a crime but is on probation rather than in prison.
      A probationer is someone who is still being trained to do a job and is on trial.
      There will be a one month probation period for newly accepted families and if the contract is terminated by either party within the first month payment is only required for the days for which childcare was provided.
      I'm a new employee still on 3 month probation period.
      Students who have been placed on academic probation in two consecutive study terms will be academically dismissed.
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      lu`nar
      'lu:nə
      adj of the moon
      -
      A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes directly behind the Earth into its umbra (shadow).
      A lunar calendar is a calendar that is based on cycles of the lunar phases.
      In lunar calendars, a lunar month is the time between two identical syzygies (new moons or full moons).
      Chinese New Year is an important traditional Chinese holiday celebrated at the turn of the Chinese calendar. In China, it is also known as the Spring Festival.
      Because the Chinese calendar is lunisolar, the Chinese New Year is often referred to as the "Lunar New Year".
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      bro`chure
      'brəuʃə
      n[C] a flyer, pamphlet or leaflet that is used to pass information about sth
      -
      Phoebe is at the sink and Chandler is looking at a ring brochure.
      "I'm taking Monica to a romantic inn in Vermont," said Chandler, showing them a brochure.
      Monica and Chandler have lots of brochures about adoption in front of them.
      Use the tips and resources in this brochure to make yourself an educated consumer.
      I picked up a copy of their summer travel brochure.
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      char`it`a`ble
      'tʃæritəbəl
      adj related to charity ¶ generous in giving money or other help ¶ kind, not judging other people in a severe way
      -
      Charitable donations: The tax code encourages people to give to their favorite charities, including nonprofit schools, health care providers, and other service organizations.
      Remember to ask the funeral home if there is a viewing, as well as if it is appropriate to send flowers or make a charitable donation.
      If the family requests a donation to a charitable organization in lieu of flowers, it is important to honor the family's wishes.
      If the family does not request a charitable contribution, it is customary to send flowers for the service.
      The charitable view is that she is telling the truth and genuinely doesn't know the size or measure of the problem which her government created.
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