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      mas`cu`line
      'mæskjulin
      adj ≠feminine
      -
      She looks rather masculine in that suit.
      Balances the Yin and the Yang energies, works with both the masculine and feminine energies, strength and vulnerability, brings balance to your whole being.
      Chandler's dad wanted him to be more masculine.
      Susan Bunch is a woman with what society would call "masculine traits" because she has never felt comfortable in skirts.
      In linguistics, grammatical gender is a specific form of noun-class system in which the division of noun classes has a correspondence with natural gender. Common gender divisions include masculine and feminine; masculine, feminine and neuter; or animate and inanimate.
      Compare these words: feminine, girly, macho, masculine, and sissy.
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      dire
      daiə
      adj very serious or terrible
      -
      New Orleans is a complex American city that is in dire need of help.
      A great deal of exploration was carried out at a time when positioning was not a very exact science, sometimes with dire consequences. In 1707, several ships of the Royal Navy struck the rocks near the Isles of Scilly, southwest of Cornwall, with a loss of four ships and 1400 men.
      Pain is poorly treated currently and there is a dire need for new and more effective drugs to improve the quality of life of people with pain.
      The media responded to Lucas's decision with dire warning: fans will not be happy.
      The Jews in Russia were in dire straits (an extremely difficult or serious situation).
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      caf`e`te`ri`a
      kæfi'tiəriə
      n[C] a restaurant where you choose and pay for your meal at a counter and take it to a table
      -
      A cafeteria is a type of food service location in which there is little or no waiting staff table service, whether a restaurant or within an institution such as a large office building or school; a school dining location is also referred to as a dining hall or canteen (in the British English).
      Cafeterias are different from coffeehouses, although that is the Spanish meaning of the English word.
      Some school cafeterias in the United States have stages and movable seating that allow them to be used as auditoriums.
      In American English, a college cafeteria is a cafeteria intended for college students. In British English it is often called the refectory. These cafeterias can be a part of a residence hall or in a separate building.
      A food court (in Asia-Pacific also called food hall) is generally an indoor plaza or common area within a facility that is contiguous with the counters of multiple food vendors and provides a common area for self-serve dining.
      In some places of learning such as high schools and universities, food courts have also come to replace or complement traditional cafeterias.
      Lane walked with a backpack into the Chardon high school cafeteria. Without warning, he pulled a .22 caliber semi-automatic pistol.
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      not`ed
      'nəutid
      adj famous, renowned
      -
      Amy Farrah Fowler is a noted neurobiologist capable of performing surgery on her own feet.
      Noted author John Gray mentions in his bestselling book on fundamental differences between the two genders a point on how either reacts during stress.
      Arthur Schlesinger, a noted historian and close family friend, gets Jacqueline Kennedy reminiscing about the old times, the good times, the campaigns and dinners and trips.
      Several years ago noted economist Hernando de Soto calculated that 4 billion people in the Third World and former communist nations owned real estate worth $9 trillion.
      She's not noted for her patience.
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      shut`ter
      'ʃʌtə
      n[C] a cover that can be closed over the outside of a window ¶ device that opens to allow light to come through the lens of a camera
      v[T] close a business etc
      -
      A window shutter is a solid and stable window covering usually consisting of a frame of vertical stiles and horizontal rails.
      Hurricane coverings, commonly known as shutters, are used in hurricane mitigation to protect houses and other structures from damage caused by storms.
      In photography, a shutter is a device that allows light to pass for a determined period of time, exposing photographic film or a light-sensitive electronic sensor to light in order to capture a permanent image of a scene.
      A shutter can also be used to allow pulses of light to pass outwards, as seen in a movie projector or a signal lamp.
      Earlier this week we suggested that it was time to put up the shutters (stop doing something).
      As she approached you could hear hundreds of camera shutters clicking.
      I've heard that DSLR camera shutters have a limited lifespan?
      There are a few things you should check before pressing the shutter release.
      You will need a fast shutter speed for photographing sport.
      The company shuttered its Madrid office a year ago.
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      myr`i`ad
      'miriəd
      n[C] an extremely large number of sth
      also an adjective
      -
      There is no simple method of keeping track of a myriad of files.
      Famed throughout the world, the park's 10,000 square miles support a myriad of wildlife, including leopards, hyenas, cheetahs, giraffes and lions.
      This is when you realize that all the myriads of books and teachings cannot do what direct experience will.
      By observing in detail the myriads of stars surrounding the center of the Milky Way we can learn a lot more about the formation and evolution of not only our galaxy, but also spiral galaxies in general
      This is a complex battle simulation with a steep learning curve. There are myriad weapons, vehicles and strategies to master, not to mention an extremely intricate backstory.
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      plum
      plʌm
      n[CU] a small round juicy fruit which is dark red, purple, or yellow ¶ dark reddish-purple color ¶ sth considered good or worth having
      -
      Dried plum fruits are called dried plums or prunes, although prunes are a distinct type of plum, and may have antedated the fruits now commonly known as plums.
      The garden was full of plum and peach trees with ripe plums hanging from every branch.
      Are plum pits (stones) poisonous if swallowed?
      An apple corer is a device for removing the core and pips from an apple.
      A plum tomato, also known as a processing tomato or paste tomato, is a type of tomato bred for sauce and packing purposes.
      Christmas pudding is a type of pudding traditionally served on Christmas Day as part of the Christmas dinner. It is sometimes known as plum pudding.
      Find great deals on eBay for plum shoes and purple heels.
      He has been lured away by the offer of a plum job at a Big Four institution.
      She's recently nabbed the most desired job in Tinseltown, the plum role of Daisy Buchanan opposite Leonardo DiCaprio in Baz Luhrmann's forthcoming The Great Gatsby.
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      hurl
      hə:l
      v[IT] fling, yell, or vomit
      -
      The mangonel threw projectiles on a lower trajectory and at a higher velocity than the trebuchet, with the intention of destroying walls, rather than hurling projectiles over them.
      The word 'catapult' comes from the Latin 'catapulta', which in turn comes from the Greek καταπέλτης, "to toss, to hurl".
      A Palestinian protester hurl a stone at Israeli soldiers as another holds an Islamic Jihad flag during clashes, following a protest against the Israeli military action in Gaza, in the West Bank city of Hebron, Friday, Aug. 1, 2014.
      They may get really upset, throwing a tantrum and hurling abuse.
      They began by hurling insults at each other and then warriors from either side would begin to run forward and throw their spears at their opponents.
      Let's stop hurling accusations and threats, and having fights.
      Hurl! was an American TV game show. The winner is the contestant that eats the most and hurls the last or not at all.
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      maze
      meiz
      n[C] a tour puzzle in the form of a complex branching passage through which the solver must find a route
      -
      The Cretan labyrinth is the oldest known maze.
      In everyday speech, both maze and labyrinth denote a complex and confusing series of pathways.
      A hedge maze is an outdoor garden maze or labyrinth in which the "walls" or dividers between passages are made of vertical hedges.
      Hampton Court Maze is a hedge maze planted some time between 1689 and 1695 by George London and Henry Wise for William III of Orange at Hampton Court Palace.
      This morning I was lost in a maze of streets.
      To help better understand the maze of rules, procedures and potential defenses to a New York Domestic Violence arrest, the New York criminal lawyers and former Manhattan prosecutors at Crotty Saland PC (Professional Corporations) have drafted easily accessible, readable and relevant content about New York's Domestic Violence crimes.
      In order to start a media outlet, a newspaper or a radio station or magazine, a person would have to navigate a maze of complex regulations and bureaucracies and employ specialized lawyers in order to get the government's permission to do so.
      Compare "maize" and "maze".
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      pol`lute
      pə'lu:t
      v[T] make air, water, soil etc dangerously dirty and not suitable for people to use ¶ spoil the good character of sb/sth
      -
      The water has been disastrously polluted by run-off from a factory.
      The usual cause of typhoid was allowing drinking water to be polluted by sewage.
      Many of Pakistan's rivers are now badly polluted with domestic sewage and industrial waste.
      It seems to me that political discourse in the U.S. is just polluted by a lot of posturing and showboating.
      Those junk newspapers that publish useless stories about sex will not only pollute your mind but also occupy the time you can use to read valuable books.
      Compare "contaminate" and "pollute".
      In the case of contamination it could be support by the environment without stopping the general chemical cycles and life cycles.
      We use pollution referring to those agents or activities that produce highly damage in the environment and damage the entire ecosystem drastically.
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      au`to`bi`og`ra`phy
      ɔ:təbai'ɔgrəfi
      n[CU] a written account of the life of a person written by that person
      -
      Mr. Obama remains the mystery candidate with an autobiography full of gaps and even fabrications.
      For example, to sell his autobiography in 1991, Mr. Obama claimed that he "was born in Kenya."
      In his Autobiography, Darwin describes himself as being a rather "naughty" child.
      In 2000 P. D. James celebrated her eightieth birthday and published her autobiography, Time to Be in Earnest.
      Compare these words: autobiography, autograph, biography, memoir, and signature.
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      raft
      ræft
      n[C] any flat structure for support or transportation over water
      -
      Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon is a novel by Jules Verne, published in 1881. It has also been published as The Giant Raft.
      Traditional raft, from 1884 edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
      Traditional or primitive rafts are constructed of wood or reeds.
      Timber rafting is used by the logging industry for the transportation of logs, by tying them together into rafts, and drifting or pulling them down a river.
      The type of raft used for recreational rafting is almost exclusively an inflatable boat, manufactured of flexible materials for use on whitewater.
      The Nokia Lumia 920 brings a raft of (a large number of) technology firsts to the table, on top of all the great advantages offered by Windows Phone 8 and exceptional industrial design, making it our new flagship smartphone device and what we believe is the world's most innovative phone.
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      sed`i`ment
      'sedimənt
      n[UC] a naturally occurring material that is broken down by processes of weathering and erosion
      -
      Sediments are most often transported by water, wind and glaciers.
      Sediment is transported based on the strength of the flow that carries it and its own size, volume, density, and shape.
      Wind results in the transportation of fine sediment and the formation of sand dune fields and soils from airborne dust.
      Loss of soil due to erosion removes useful farmland, adds to sediment loads, and can help transport anthropogenic fertilizers into the river system.
      Sediment in wine, beer, Turkish coffee or other beverages is known as dregs.
      Silt falls out of suspension via sedimentation and forms soil (some of which may eventually become sedimentary rock).
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      in`fra`red
      infrə'red
      adj relating to or using a type of light that is warm but cannot be seen
      -
      Waves with higher frequencies have shorter wavelengths, and lower frequencies have longer wavelengths.
      The radio spectrum is the part of the electromagnetic spectrum corresponding to frequencies lower below 300 GHz.
      Radio waves have wavelengths ranging from 1 m to 100 km.
      Microwaves are a form of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths ranging from as long as 1 m to as short as 1 mm.
      Infrared (IR) is invisible radiant energy, electromagnetic radiation with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, extending from the nominal red edge of the visible spectrum at 700 nm.
      Most of the thermal radiation emitted by objects near room temperature is infrared.
      Night-vision devices using active near-infrared illumination allow people or animals to be observed without the observer being detected.
      Visible light is usually defined as having a wavelength in the range of 400 nm to 700 nm.
      Ultraviolet (UV) light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength shorter than that of visible light but longer than X-rays, that is, in the range between approximately 10 nm and 400 nm.
      Infra means below; ultra means above.
      Most X-rays have a wavelength in the range of 0.01 nm to 10 nm.
      1 mm = 1,000,000 nm.
      Gamma rays typically have wavelengths less than 10 picometers (less than the diameter of an atom).
      The picometer is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one trillionth (i.e., 1/1,000,000,000,000) of a meter (i.e., 1/1,000 nm).
      Pico means very small.
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      whole`sale
      'həulseil
      n[U] the sale of goods in large quantities
      also an adjective, an adverb, and a verb
      -
      Wholesaling, jobbing, or distributing is the sale of goods or merchandise to retailers; to industrial, commercial, institutional, or other professional business users; or to other wholesalers and related subordinated services.
      In the banking industry "wholesale" usually refers to wholesale banking, providing tailored services to large customers, in contrast with retail banking, providing standardized services to large numbers of smaller customers.
      The alternative to selling wholesale to distributors or retailers is to sell retail either through company owned stores or online.
      It is available at a wholesale price of just $ 1.50.
      "I can get it for you wholesale," said Rachel.
      Then it is wholesaled to the retailer then retailed to the customer.
      Costco Wholesale Corporation is a membership-only warehouse club that provides a wide selection of merchandise.
      Compare these words: bulk, outlet, retail and wholesale.
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      bowl`ing
      'bəuliŋ
      n[U] a series of sports or leisure activities in which a player rolls or throws a ~ ball towards a target
      -
      In pin bowling variations, the target is usually to knock over pins at the end of a lane.
      Ten-pin bowling is a sport in which a player, or "bowler" rolls a bowling ball down a wooden or synthetic (polyurethane) lane with the objective of scoring points by knocking down as many pins as possible. In Canada, the United States, United Kingdom and Australia, the game is commonly referred to as just "Bowling".
      The 41.5-inch-wide (105 cm), 60-foot-long (18 m) lane is bordered along its length by semicylindrical channels (commonly called "gutters") which are designed to collect errant balls.
      The bowler is allowed 10 frames in which to knock down pins, with frames one through nine being composed of up to two rolls.
      Effectively, there are three kinds of marks given in a score; a strike (all ten down in the first ball), a spare (all ten down by the second ball), and an open (one or more missed pins still standing after the second ball).
      Bowling has a unique scoring system which keeps track not only of the current pinfall in a frame, but also strikes and spares which allow for the value of subsequent pinfall.
      The National Bowling Stadium is a 363,000-square-foot ten-pin bowling stadium in Reno, Nevada.
      Like when you go bowling and you know you're in somebody else's shoes?
      Joey takes out a bowling ball and a propane torch.
      "That doesn't count. Do-over, do-over." "There are no do-overs in Wii bowling."
      The theater's above a bowling alley (a building where you go bowling) so it's a little noisy.
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      ap`prai`sal
      ə'preizəl
      n[UC] a judgement of the value, performance or nature of sb/sth, evaluation
      -
      A fair appraisal is required without any bias.
      Appraisal theory is the theory in psychology that emotions are extracted from our evaluations (appraisals or estimates) of events that cause specific reactions in different people.
      They usually offer to give you an appraisal of your property, interview the best agents in the area, choose the best agent, and negotiate their marketing fees and their commission structure.
      Thank you for an insightful and honest appraisal of how it really is for people living with disability.
      I look forward to reading your critical appraisal of the few actual studies that you referenced.
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      ship`ment
      'ʃipmənt
      n[UC] a load of goods or the act of sending them
      -
      The goods are ready for shipment.
      But the United States raised the alarm about a shipment of tainted meat stopped at the border on Sept.
      In January 2013, the International Civil Aviation Organization is set to introduce tighter regulations for the shipment of lithium ion batteries.
      Try to obtain all possible documents before the shipment.
      One of the rockets now is being readied for shipment to Patrick Air Force Base in Florida, where it is expected to be test-fired sometimes around the start of the geophysical year.
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      as`tro`nom`i`cal
      æstrə'nɔmikəl
      adj relating to the scientific study of the stars ¶ describing an amount which is extremely large
      -
      The figures are astronomical.
      The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada is dedicated to the promotion of astronomy and its related sciences.
      The amount of money Australia has wasted trying to re-invent the wheel is astronomical.
      The sums lost through card fraud are astronomical.
      "I'm very non-traditional in how I want my wedding, so I don't think it would cost an astronomical amount," said Phoebe.
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      dime
      daim
      n[C] a ten-cent coin
      -
      The dime is the smallest in diameter and is the thinnest of all U.S. coins currently minted for circulation. As of 2011, the dime coin cost 5.65 cents to produce.
      In 2003, a group of conservative Republicans in Congress proposed removing Roosevelt's image from the dime, and replacing it with that of President Ronald Reagan, although he was still alive.
      In Canada, a dime is a coin worth ten cents. It is the smallest (in physical size) of the currently issued Canadian coins. It is nearly identical in size to the American dime, but unlike its counterpart, the Canadian dime is magnetic due to a distinct metal composition: from 1968 to 1999 it was composed entirely of nickel, and since 2000 it has had a high steel content.
      A nickel is a coin in the US or Canada that is worth five cents.
      A quarter is a coin of the US and Canada worth 25 cents.
      Right-wing idiots are a dime a dozen (=ten a penny).
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      con`fer
      kən'fə:
      v[I] discuss ¶ give or grant
      -
      A convention center (American English, conference centre outside the USA) is a large building that is designed to hold a convention, where individuals and groups gather to promote and share common interests.
      When counsel appears in person, he is permitted to confer with his client in private.
      My son has graduated from university and was conferred with his degree on Thursday.
      For his work, the Yuan court posthumously conferred on him the title of Duke of Liangguo (凉国公).
      He was conferred with an honorary degree of Doctor of Law by the University of the West Indies Mona during the school's graduation ceremony.
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      lin`er
      'lainə
      n[C] a large ship for passengers ¶ a piece of material used inside sth ¶ a type of make-up
      -
      An ocean liner is a ship designed to transport people from one seaport to another along regular long-distance maritime routes according to a schedule.
      RMS Queen Mary is a retired ocean liner that sailed primarily in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1936 to 1967 for the Cunard Line (known as Cunard-White Star Line when the vessel entered service).
      A cruise ship or cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages.
      MS Oasis of the Seas is an Oasis-class cruise ship, delivered to her owner, Royal Caribbean International, in October 2009.
      An airliner is an airplane, usually large, used for transporting passengers and cargo.
      A bin liner, garbage bag, or trash bag, is a plastic bag that you put inside a waste bin or dustbin.
      Acoustic liner is a perforated metal sheet used to lower the noise of aircraft engines.
      In sewing and tailoring, a lining is an inner layer of fabric, fur, or other material inserted into clothing, hats, luggage, curtains, handbags and similar items.
      Eyeliner is a cosmetic used to define the eyes. Eyeliner was first used in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia as a dark black line around the eyes.
      Depending on its texture, eyeliner can be softly smudged or clearly defined.
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      mas`ter`y
      'ma:stəri
      n[U] great knowledge, thorough understanding, or great skill ¶ control or power
      -
      Kristin Hanson began her journey toward jewelry-making mastery by walking down a path less traveled.
      As for Joe, he seems to have developed even more mastery with the acoustic guitar, with lots of innovative and rhythmic picking.
      She possesses complete technical mastery of her instrument.
      The orchestra is unrivalled in terms of technical mastery and sheer vitality.
      She wants mastery over her husband.
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      ham`burg`er
      'hæmbə:gə
      n[UC] ground beef, patty ¶ a sandwich consisting of one or more cooked patties of ground meat
      -
      A hamburger (also called a beef burger, hamburger sandwich, or burger) is a sandwich consisting of one or more cooked patties of ground meat, usually beef, placed inside a sliced bun.
      Hamburgers are often served with lettuce, bacon, tomato, onion, pickles, cheese and condiments such as mustard, mayonnaise, ketchup, relish, and green chili.
      The term "burger" can also be applied to the meat patty on its own, especially in the UK where the term "patty" is rarely used. The term may be prefixed with the type of meat used as in "turkey burger".
      Burger King, often abbreviated as BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants headquartered in the United States.
      The McDonald's Corporation is the world's largest chain of hamburger fast food restaurants, serving around 68 million customers daily in 119 countries across 35,000 outlets.
      The Big Mac is a hamburger sold by McDonald's, an international fast food restaurant chain.
      The Big Mac consists of two 1.6 oz (45.4 g) 100 per cent beef patties, American cheese, "special sauce" (a variant of Thousand Island dressing), iceberg lettuce, pickles, and onions, served in a three-part sesame seed bun.
      The Big Mac is known worldwide and is often used as a symbol of American capitalism.
      The Economist has used it as a reference point for comparing the cost of living in different countries - the Big Mac Index - as it is so widely available and is comparable across markets. This index is sometimes referred to as Burgernomics.
      KFC (the name was originally an acronym for Kentucky Fried Chicken) is a fast food restaurant chain that specializes in fried chicken and is headquartered in the United States.
      It is the world's second largest restaurant chain (as measured by sales) after McDonald's, with 18,875 outlets in 118 countries and territories as of December 2013.
      The company is a subsidiary of Yum! Brands, a restaurant company that also owns the Pizza Hut and Taco Bell chains.
      A Hamburger is a native or inhabitant of the city of Hamburg.
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      rhe`tor`i`cal
      ri'tɔrikəl
      adj relating to a style of speaking or writing that is grand and impressive ¶ intended to influence people, but not completely honest or sincere ¶ asked only to make a statement or to produce an effect rather than to get an answer
      -
      Hyperbole is the use of exaggeration as a rhetorical device or figure of speech. An example of hyperbole is: "The bag weighed a ton."
      A rhetorical device or resource of language is a technique that an author or speaker uses to convey to the listener or reader a meaning with the goal of persuading him or her towards considering a topic from a different perspective, using sentences designed to encourage or provoke a rational argument from an emotional display of a given perspective or action.
      Two common rhetorical devices are irony and metaphor.
      An example of rhetorical device is this passage attributed to a speech by Abraham Lincoln about a political adversary in which Lincoln said that his adversary had "dived down deeper into the sea of knowledge and come up drier than any other man he knew".
      The elaborate settings, gatherings, the dry rhetorical speeches, the countdown to elections with music and dance, the showdown of money and muscle power etc has all curtained the real purpose of elections.
      A rhetorical question is a figure of speech in the form of a question that is asked in order to make a point. A common example is the question "Can't you do anything right?".
      A figure of speech is the use of a word or a phrase, which transcends its literal interpretation.
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