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      hype
      haip
      v[T] use a lot of ads and other publicity to influence or interest people
      also a noun
      -
      Is iPhone 5 everything it's hyped up to be?
      The absurd debates were hyped by the media and reviewed like stage plays.
      To hype someone up means to make them very excited about something.
      I'm suspicious of the media hype.
      Please people get a grip and stop believing in all the hype you hear on radio and TV.
      Compare these words: exaggerate, hype, and propaganda.
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      rhyme
      raim
      v[IT] if two words or lines of poetry ~, they end with the same last sound
      also a noun
      -
      "Can you think of a rhyme for Rudolph?" "Budolph?"
      Emma! Your name poses a dilemma. 'Cause not much else rhymes with Emma!
      Phoebe thought everything that rhymed was true. She thought if she'd worked with stocks, she'd have to live in a box, only eat lox, and have a pet fox.
      Like all the Little Lion books, it's written in rhyme and it has him overcoming an obstacle and learning a lesson with the help of his Dad.
      A limerick is a short, humorous, often ribald or nonsense poem, especially one in five-line anapestic meter with a strict rhyme scheme (AABBA). Here is an example: It's been told an old man had sent emails, To some various dubious females, He was asked what they said, But he just shook his head. I would rather not go into details.
      A nursery rhyme is a traditional poem or song for young children in Britain and many other countries. Here is an example: Fiddle dee dee, fiddle dee dee, The fly has married the bumblebee, They went to the church, And married was she, The fly has married the bumblebee.
      "This Little Piggy" is an English language nursery rhyme and fingerplay.
      "Rhythm of the Rain" is a song performed by The Cascades, released in November 1962.
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      jolt
      dʒəult
      v[IT] jerk ¶ give sb a sudden shock
      also a noun
      -
      My phone jolted out of my pocket as I ran for the bus.
      We all were jolted out of our sleep from the train roaring 20 feet behind the hotel at three in the morning.
      A resident said she was jolted by the crashing sound.
      The plane landed with a jolt.
      Rachel's letter gave a bit jolt to Ross.
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      que`ry
      'kwiəri
      v[IT] ask a question ¶ express doubt about sth
      also a noun
      -
      I queried him several times by phone and email.
      The girl on check out was not very friendly when I queried the bill.
      I have a query about the 4th point.
      A web search query is a query that a user enters into a web search engine to satisfy his or her information needs.
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      plank
      plæŋk
      n[C] a long narrow piece of wooden board ¶ an important aspect of sth
      -
      A plank is a piece of timber that is flat, elongated, and rectangular with parallel faces that are higher and longer than wide.
      The plank (also called a front hold, hover, or abdominal bridge) is an isometric core strength exercise that involves maintaining a difficult position for extended periods of time.
      The most common plank is the front plank which is held in a push-up position with the body's weight borne on forearms, elbows, and toes.
      Walking the plank was a form of punishment thought to have been practiced on special occasion by pirates, mutineers, and other rogue seafarers.
      For the amusement of the perpetrators (and the psychological torture of the victims), captives were forced to walk off a wooden plank or beam extended over the side of a ship.
      "As thick as two short planks" means "very stupid".
      The U.S. which has made finding and killing Bin Laden a central plank of its war on terrorism.
      A key plank of the white paper is to implement a national reform agenda to lift this country's productivity.
      The party unveiled welfare reform as a major plank of its election campaign.
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      ren`o`vate
      'renəveit
      v[T] repair and improve sth, esp a building
      -
      If you renovate your home beforehand, then you will appeal to more homebuyers.
      The owner will receive a 30,000 low interest loan to renovate the property.
      The home is an original log cabin but it has been renovated and expanded.
      This building was renovated by the Government of Ghana in November 2011.
      Compare these words: innovate, redecorate, renovate, and refurbish.
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      du`pli`cate
      'du:plikeit
      v[T] make an exact copy of sth ¶ repeat sth in exactly the same way
      adj exactly the same
      n[C] an exact copy
      -
      It's a unique, one-of-a-kind experience that can't be duplicated.
      Is it wise to spend resources trying to duplicate work that has already been done in other countries?
      Mike used a duplicate key to unlock his cell.
      If you don't have an Undo feature, always keep the original image safe, or make duplicates of the image at each stage.
      This is an exact duplicate of the Wolowitz zero-gravity Human Waste Disposal System as deployed on the International Space Station.
      If something is in duplicate, there are two copies of it.
      The complete application package must be submitted in duplicate by postal mail.
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      de`tach
      di'tætʃ
      v[IT] become separated from sth, or remove sth from sth
      -
      The cables detach from the headphones really easily with a simple push of a button.
      As a hybrid device it has a 11.6 inch screen which detaches from the keyboard.
      They detached themselves from the rest of the crowd and took a seat in a corner.
      More serious causes of bleeding may be because of the placenta detaching from the uterus.
      It is hard to detach yourself from your children and recognize that once they reach a certain stage; you have to let them make their own way in the world.
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      brag
      bræg
      v[IT] boast
      -
      I don't wanna brag, but a lot of the ideas were mine.
      I don't like to brag about it, but I give the best massages!
      Amanda is always bragging about all the famous people she's met.
      David shouldn't brag too much about the ring.
      Dude, you don't have to brag! We got nothing here!
      He bragged that he had told his wife she needed to do all the dishes and housework.
      Compare these words: boast, brag, bluff, gloat, parade, smug, and strut.
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      nov`ice
      'nɔvis
      n[C] beginner
      -
      The route is suitable for novices and experienced crews and we will help you every step of the way with your vehicle and personal preparations.
      This book is designed to help both the complete novice and the more experienced researcher to find out what resources are available and where and how they can be accessed.
      I disagree with Microsoft's choice to get rid of the Start menu, and that change was always going to confuse a lot of novice users.
      In many Buddhist orders, a man or woman who intends to take ordination must first become a novice.
      Compare these words: newbie, novice, rookie, and veteran.
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      o`ver`throw
      əuvə'θrəu
      v[T] force a leader or government out of their position of power, oust
      also a noun
      -
      What is our goal? Is it to overthrow the Iranian regime?
      On September 11, 1973, a Chilean General, with the help of the CIA, overthrew the government of Chile and installed a military dictatorship that killed thousands.
      WikiLeaks isn't overthrowing the US government.
      They both seek an overthrow of the Afghan government.
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      pin`point
      'pinpɔint
      v[T] discover exactly where sth is ¶ discover or explain exactly what sth is, identify
      n[C] a very small area of sth
      adj very accurate and exact
      -
      Vader's men managed to back track a message sent from the planet's surface, and pinpointed the location of the Rebel from the shuttle.
      It is hard to pinpoint what exactly makes sports stars turn to drugs; it could be the pressures of coaches, the ambition to be the best by any means, or just possibly laziness.
      It will be difficult to pinpoint how much of the portfolio is going to be at risk.
      A spacecraft will be seen as a steady - not blinking - white pinpoint of light moving slowly across the sky.
      Proper focus means altering the curvature of your lens so that the rays of light entering your eye fall on your retina with pinpoint accuracy.
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      crest
      krest
      n[C] the top of a hill or wave ¶ a group of feathers that stand up on top of a bird's head ¶ design above the shield on a coat of arms
      v[T] reach the top of a hill or mountain
      -
      The sun was just declining, and, resting upon the crest of the distant Sierra Nevada, seemed to cover it with a golden snow.
      If one watches an ocean wave moving along the ocean water, one can observe that the crest of the wave is moving from one location to another over a given interval of time.
      The crest is a prominent feature exhibited by several bird and dinosaur species on their heads.
      The Grey crowned crane is an example of a crested bird species.
      They ended up at the crest of the housing market with a beautiful place that was leveraged out 3 times the amount they had initially paid for it and went almost bust in the process.
      I crested one hill only to realize that another stood in my way.
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      con`tra`dic`to`ry
      kɔntrə'diktəri
      adj disagreeing with each other and cannot both or all be true
      -
      His visa, granted in late October, had been cancelled due to "contradictory messages" in his application.
      She had made two contradictory statements, one of which logically had to be false.
      The last 5 months have witnessed a succession of contradictory statements and actions on the part of the authorities.
      A series of contradictory demands made a very serious dilemma for him.
      We find that some of the latter arguments are actually contradictory to the prior arguments.
      Compare "contradictory" and "contrary".
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      cav`i`ty
      'kæviti
      n[C] a hole or space inside sth
      -
      Dental caries (Latin, "rot"), also known as tooth decay or a cavity, is an infection, bacterial in origin, that causes demineralization and destruction of the hard tissues of the teeth.
      Cavity walls consist of two 'skins' separated by a hollow space (cavity). The cavity serves as a way to drain water back out through weep holes at the base of the wall system or above windows, but is not necessarily vented.
      An important safe food handling step is to remove all of the stuffing from the cavity of a chicken or turkey as soon as it comes out the oven. Otherwise, it may take the stuffing more than the two hours to cool to refrigeration temperatures.
      Roast with 2 garlic cloves in the cavity of the bird.
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      in`fe`ri`or
      in'fiəriə
      adj ≠superior
      also a noun
      -
      "Kripke, your robot is inferior, and it will be defeated by ours," said Sheldon.
      I found the screen to be crisp, clear and vivid, though inferior to the superb Retina display on the current iPad.
      The city's bus laws were designed to humiliate and remind Blacks of their inferior status.
      It is an order issued by the high court to an inferior court.
      Sheldon considered everyone his intellectual inferior.
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      bribe
      braib
      n[C] money or a present given to sb so that they will help you by doing sth dishonest or illegal
      also a verb
      -
      Kickback is the synonym of bribe.
      "Do health inspectors work on commission?" "No, bribes."
      It's not exactly ethical but I sent him a little bribe to tip the scales in my direction.
      The zoo janitor tried to get Ross to bribe him.
      Chandler and Monica are discussing how to bribe the maitre d'.
      Bribery is the act of giving or taking bribes.
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      a`vert
      ə'və:t
      v[T] turn your eyes away ¶ prevent, avoid
      -
      Uh, public display of affection coming up. You can avert your eyes.
      Chandler averts his eyes and walks in.
      Chandler writes it on a piece of paper and hands it to Monica as Phoebe averts her eyes.
      Ross averts his eyes by looking around the bathroom.
      With a little knowledge and a cool head, tragedy can be averted.
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      fuzz`y
      'fʌzi
      adj covered with soft short hair or fur, downy ¶ unclear, blurred, hazy
      -
      Chandler and Joey's chick is little and fuzzy.
      It has a pink fuzzy ball on the key chain.
      That pair of fuzzy slippers belongs to Stephanie.
      Over sixty million people saw Mitt Romney portraying himself as a big warm fuzzy bear who loves everybody.
      Phoebe's client with the fuzzy back gives her his beach house.
      Rachel's tongue felt a little fuzzy after she smoked.
      Since the heavy rain last night I have lost the signal to a limited number of Sky channels - they are coming up with a very fuzzy picture and no sound.
      She still has fuzzy memories of what occurred beforehand.
      Compared to traditional binary sets (where variables may take on true or false values), fuzzy logic variables may have a truth value that ranges in degree between 0 and 1.
      I have to say it was really nice to be applauded and cheered at by all the Apple employees when we exited the store. This certainly gave us a warm and fuzzy (full of love and kindness) feeling.
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      stub`born
      'stʌbən
      adj determined not to change your mind, obstinate ¶ difficult to get rid of or deal with, tough
      -
      Oh, Leonard, don't trouble yourself. He's stubborn.
      Sheldon can be as stubborn as a mule.
      He has a stubborn streak (a tendency to be stubborn) and he is certainly not going to do anything because of external pressure from the university.
      And oh yes, lest we forget, the Taurus individual is stubborn - the most stubborn of all the zodiac signs. Once he forms an opinion, he is immovable, and nothing will change his mind.
      The offensive met with stubborn (very strong and determined) resistance in several sectors.
      For many people, Churchill's stubborn refusal to admit defeat or a lost cause (something that has no chance of succeeding) during World War Two has given him a reputation few other politicians have ever achieved.
      I see that stubborn determination in the way he goes about getting things done on behalf of the poor and destitute.
      ÜBERWEISS (over white) is designed to remove stubborn stains. It's new, it's German, it's extra-tough.
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      spe`ci`fi`ca`tion
      spesifi'keiʃən
      n[CU] a detailed description of how sth is, or should be, designed or made
      -
      A person specification is written by the firm and outlines the type of person the firm wants.
      A job description is a list that a person might use for general tasks, or functions, and responsibilities of a position. It may often include to whom the position reports, specifications such as the qualifications or skills needed by the person in the job, or a salary range.
      A job specification goes beyond a mere description - in addition, it highlights the mental and physical attributes required of the job holder.
      Interested consultants should submit their CV accompanied by a motivation letter, describing how they meet the specification.
      Part 2 of the standard is a technical specification.
      There was no product specification sheet found in the website.
      The design specification details what is to be built, how it is to be built and how the system will function.
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      wield
      wi:ld
      v[T] hold sth, ready to use it as a weapon or tool ¶ have a lot of power or influence, and to use it
      -
      Long swords wielded by the knightly class in the 13th century only weighed about 3-4 pounds at maximum.
      The attacker, reportedly wielding a knife and handgun, then boarded the bus and fired at the driver before being taken down by police.
      He will wield enormous power in the world and his decisions will affect the lives of every nation.
      Keep it simple. Short words wield power and impact.
      It is clear that plan has failed, leaving him to wield the axe on benefits.
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      tsu`na`mi
      tsu'na:mi
      n[C] tidal wave
      -
      A tsunami, also known as a seismic sea wave, is a series of water waves caused by the displacement of a large volume of a body of water, generally an ocean or a large lake.
      Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions (including detonations of underwater nuclear devices), landslides, glacier calvings, meteorite impacts and other disturbances above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami.
      The earthquake triggered powerful tsunami waves that reached heights of up to 40.5 meters.
      The tsunami was given various names, including the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, South Asian tsunami, Indonesian tsunami, the Christmas tsunami and the Boxing Day tsunami.
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      cel`e`ry
      'seləri
      n[U] a vegetable with crisp light green stalks
      -
      Celery is used around the world as a vegetable for the crisp petiole (leaf stalk).
      Celery, onions, and bell peppers are the "holy trinity" of Louisiana Creole and Cajun cuisine.
      Celery is used in weight-loss diets, where it provides low-calorie dietary fiber bulk.
      Celery is often incorrectly thought to be a "negative-calorie food," the digestion of which burns more calories than the body can obtain. In fact, eating celery provides positive net calories, with digestion only consuming a small proportion of the calories taken in.
      I cut up a bunch of celery on Sunday night, sit it in water. It stays absolutely crispy all week.
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      driz`zle
      'drizəl
      v[IT] raining lightly ¶ let a liquid fall on food in a small stream or in small drops
      also a noun
      -
      A dark and starless night closed in, accompanied by cold winds and drizzling rain.
      It's been alternately drizzling and pouring all day, sometimes torrentially.
      Put fish on foil, drizzle with olive oil, add some chili flakes, garlic and salt and pepper.
      Scatter with cheese and tomatoes, drizzle with olive oil and season.
      Freezing drizzle is drizzle that freezes on contact with the ground or an object at or near the surface. When freezing drizzle accumulates on land it creates an icy layer of glaze.
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