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      mys`tic`al
      'mistikəl
      adj relating to or involving mysterious religious or spiritual powers ¶ relating to mystics or mysticism
      -
      The third eye (also known as the inner eye) is a mystical and esoteric concept referring in part to the ajna (brow) chakra in certain spiritual traditions.
      The relationship between horse and rider is mystical and incredible.
      At the age of fifteen I had a mystical experience that scared the hell out of me.
      These places are thus believed to have great mystical powers.
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      fall`out
      'fɔ:laut
      n[U] the radioactive dust in the air after a nuclear explosion ¶ the unpleasant effects of sth that has happened
      -
      In April 1986,Russia's nuclear power station at Chernobyl exploded,killing 250 people and sending radioactive fallout around the world.
      Cancer deaths caused by fallout from weapons testing could rise to 2.4 million over the next few centuries.
      The political fallout of the affair cost him his job.
      The fallout from the European financial crisis has continued to affect business.
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      draw`back
      'drɔ:bæk
      n[C] disadvantage
      -
      The big drawback is that hydrogen poses an explosion risk.
      The drawback to this approach is that if the root CA were to be needed, the corresponding hardware for those drives would need to be reclaimed.
      However, e-ink screens have some drawbacks: they're black and white, and the pages don't refresh as quickly as those on an LCD do.
      These different TV types have their own strengths and drawbacks.
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      snore
      snɔ:
      v[I] breathe in a noisy way through your mouth and nose while you sleep
      also a noun
      -
      Snoring is the vibration of respiratory structures and the resulting sound, due to obstructed air movement during breathing while sleeping.
      In some cases the sound may be soft, but in other cases, it can be loud and unpleasant.
      Snoring during sleep may be a sign, or first alarm, of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).
      Researchers say that snoring is a factor of sleep deprivation.
      Ross you were snoring. My father's boat didn't make that much noise when it hit rocks!
      Joey's bedroom, he is asleep and snoring loudly.
      Loud snores from the other room kept me awake.
      Sheldon, we have to get out of here. (Penny snores)
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      ap`pen`dix
      ə'pendiks
      n[C] a small bag of tissue that is attached to the large intestine ¶ a section giving extra information at the end of a book or document
      -
      The appendix (or vermiform appendix) is a blind-ended tube connected to the cecum, from which it develops embryologically.
      The term "vermiform" comes from Latin and means "worm-shaped".
      In other documents, most importantly in legal contracts, an addendum is an additional document not included in the main part of the contract.
      It is an ad hoc item, usually compiled and executed after the main document, which contains additional terms, obligations or information.
      An Additional Agreement to a contract is often an addendum to a contract.
      It is to be distinguished from other appendices to a contract which may contain additional terms, specifications, provisions, standard forms or other information which have been separated out from the main body of the contract.
      These are called: an appendix (general term), an annex (which includes information, usually large texts or tables, which are independent stand-alone works which have been included in the contract, such as a tax table, or a large excerpt from a book), or an exhibit (often used in court cases).
      Similarly an attachment is used usually for e-mails, while an enclosure is used with a paper letter.
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      in`ter`dis`ci`plin`ary
      intər'disəpləneri
      adj involving different subjects of study
      -
      Anthropology is an interdisciplinary major, and students who earn degrees in the subject can work in a multitude of fields.
      An interdisciplinary team of qualified personnel, in line with the project's requirements, will work on automated systems to produce and supply goods and services on a massive scale.
      In the fall 2010 semester, Goucher College launched an interdisciplinary environmental studies major.
      This interdisciplinary three-credit course, open to both social work and law students, explores the roles of social workers and lawyers in the area of domestic violence.
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      cam`ou`flage
      'kæməfla:ʒ
      v[T] hide sb/sth by making them look like the natural background ¶ hide the truth
      also a noun
      -
      Compare these words: camouflage, conceal, disguise and masquerade.
      Camouflage is the use of any combination of materials, coloration or illumination for concealment, either by making animals or objects hard to see (crypsis), or by disguising them as something else (mimesis)
      Examples include the leopard's spotted coat, the battledress of a modern soldier, and the leaf-mimic katydid's wings.
      A third approach, motion dazzle, confuses the observer with a conspicuous pattern, making the object visible but momentarily harder to locate.
      The majority of camouflage methods aim for crypsis, often through a general resemblance to the background, high contrast disruptive coloration, eliminating shadow, and countershading.
      During and after the Second World War, a variety of camouflage schemes were used for aircraft and for ground vehicles in different theatres of war.
      The use of radar in the Cold War period has largely made camouflage for fixed-wing military aircraft obsolete.
      A soldier applying camouflage face paint; both helmet and jacket are disruptively patterned.
      Non-military use of camouflage includes making cell telephone towers less obtrusive and helping hunters to approach wary game animals.
      Chameleons or chamaeleons (family Chamaeleonidae) are a distinctive and highly specialized clade of old world lizards.
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      per`sua`sive
      pə'sweisiv
      adj able to make other people believe sth or do what you ask
      -
      Yetis are smooth talkers. They're persuasive. That's why you never see any pictures of them. "Come here, baby. Give me the camera."
      "Well, I must say, you make a very persuasive case for it," said Mrs Latham.
      "Well, Penny can be very persuasive. She's gotten me to do a lot of things I wouldn't normally do." "Because she has sex with you." "Yeah, she does."
      The reasons I have heard are not very persuasive.
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      con`tes`tant
      kən'testənt
      n[C] sb who who competes in a contest
      -
      All right. Let's get the contestants out of their isolation booths.
      Get your foot off my contestant! Judge!
      Judge rules, no violation.
      Oh really? That'd be great! Hey you guys can be the contestants!
      All right. Uhh, ok. Our first contestant is Ross Geller. Why don't you tell us a little bit about yourself Ross?
      I'm sorry, I don't believe contestants are allowed to talk to each other.
      Compare these words: combatant, competitor, contestant, and rival.
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      ar`ro`gance
      'ærəgəns
      n[U] behavior that shows that you think you are better or more important than other people
      -
      If you accuse someone of hubris, you are accusing them of arrogant pride.
      Oh, you're so arrogant. If you were a superhero, your name would be Captain Arrogant. And you know what your superpower would be? Arrogance.
      You're wrong again. If my superpower were arrogance, my name would be Dr. Arroganto.
      More importantly to me is the arrogance that man alone could cause climate change by our actions.
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      scrib`ble
      'skribəl
      v[IT] write sth quickly and carelessly ¶ draw marks that have no meaning
      n[U] careless hurried writing
      -
      Why do doctors scribble the prescription to a patient?
      I scribbled his phone number in my address book.
      Holy smokes. If by "holy smokes" she mean a derivative restatement of the kind of stuff you can find scribbled on the wall of any men's room at MIT, sure.
      Someone had scribbled all over my picture.
      I hope you can read my scribble.
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      av`id
      'ævid
      adj keen
      -
      He was an avid collector of bras.
      If you're an avid sci-fi reader, it probably isn't for you.
      In an old Simpsons magazine, an avid fan wrote a highly detailed analysis of the (then mostly unexplored) question of which state Springfield is in.
      He is CTO of a hosting/colocation firm, a tech writer, and an avid iOS app developer.
      Colocation is the provision of computing services in a third-party colocation centre.
      A colocation centre or colocation center (also spelled co-location, collocation, colo, or coloc) is a type of data centre where equipment, space, and bandwidth are available for rental to retail customers.
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      a`cous`tic
      ə'ku:stik
      adj relating to sound or hearing ¶ used for describing music that is not made louder with electronic equipment
      -
      The microphone converts acoustic waves to electrical signals for transmission.
      The concert was recorded in a French church that is famous for its acoustics.
      An acoustic fingerprint is a condensed digital summary, deterministically generated from an audio signal, that can be used to identify an audio sample or quickly locate similar items in an audio database.
      Acoustic music is music that solely or primarily uses instruments that produce sound through acoustic means, as opposed to electric or electronic means.
      An acoustic guitar or other instrument is one whose sound is produced without any electrical equipment.
      The acoustic bass guitar (also called ABG or acoustic bass) is a bass instrument with a hollow wooden body similar to, though usually somewhat larger than a steel-string acoustic guitar.
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      veer
      viə
      v[I] change direction, swerve
      -
      If something veers in a certain direction, it suddenly moves in that direction.
      The plane veered wildly.
      The wind was veering north.
      The conversation veered off in a new direction.
      Our talk soon veered onto the subject of football.
      Ukraine gained independence after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and has since veered between seeking closer integration with Western Europe and reconciliation with Russia, which supplies most of the country's energy.
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      com`mend
      kə'mend
      v[T] praise or recommend
      -
      If you commend someone or something, you praise them formally.
      For a low-budget film, it has much to commend it.
      He was commended for his brave actions.
      He was commended on his handling of the situation.
      If something commends itself to you, you approve of it.
      If someone commends a person or thing to you, they tell you that you will find them good or useful.
      I earnestly commend this report to you.
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      mile`stone
      'mailstəun
      n[C] a stone next to a road that shows the distance to a particular place ¶ a very important event in the development of sth
      -
      A milestone is one of a series of numbered markers placed along a road or boundary at intervals of one mile or occasionally, parts of a mile.
      They are alternatively known as mile markers, mileposts or mile posts (sometimes abbreviated MPs).
      Mileage is the distance along the road from a fixed commencement point.
      In fact, it could qualify as a milestone event.
      HTC's beautiful new Windows Phone 8X and 8S with our brand is a big milestone for both companies.
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      out`skirts
      'autskə:ts
      n[[pl] the areas of a town or city that are farthest away from the center
      -
      The following video appeared on the Facebook page of Matan Ladani and was recorded in the town of Ashdod, a suburb on the outskirts of Tel Aviv, on the morning of Nov. 16, 2012.
      I live on the outskirts of London.
      By 15 July American forces had reached the outskirts of St. Lo, but the garrison holding the town refused yield.
      There are elderly people and children dying in the outskirts.
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      cus`tom`a`ry
      'kʌstəmeri
      adj usual
      -
      In restaurants, a gratuity of 15% to 20% of the amount of a customer's check is customary when good service is provided.
      It's football, it's just football. This is great! This is the first time I've ever enjoyed football. It may be customary to get a beer.
      Namaste is a customary greeting when individuals meet or farewell.
      It's customary for the player on the right-hand lane to bowl first.
      As you're in distress, it would be customary for me to offer you a hot beverage.
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      la`va
      'la:və
      n[U] rock in the form of hot liquid ¶ the solid rock that forms when liquid lava becomes cold
      -
      Lava is the molten rock expelled by a volcano during an eruption and the resulting rock after solidification and cooling.
      When first erupted from a volcanic vent, lava is a liquid at temperatures from 700 to 1,200 °C (1,292 to 2,192 °F).
      A lava flow is a moving outpouring of lava, which is created during a non-explosive effusive eruption.
      When it has stopped moving, lava solidifies to form igneous rock.
      Raft on a river of lava? Come on; ride on the Magic School Bus!
      A lava lamp (or Astro lamp) is a decorative novelty item, invented by British accountant Edward Craven Walker, the founder of Mathmos, in 1963.
      Lava lamps aren't just novel relics of the '60s and '70s. Lined up in a colorful collection, they can be pretty neat office accessories, setting a tranquil mood.
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      con`grat`u`late
      kən'grætʃuleit
      v[T] express joy or acknowledgment, as for the achievement or good fortune of another
      -
      He congratulated Rachel on the birth of Emma, her daughter.
      Everyone started congratulating her.
      I really must congratulate the organisers for a well run and enjoyable event.
      You can congratulate yourself on having done a good job.
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      lar`va
      'la:və
      n[C] grub
      -
      A larva (plural larvae /'larvi:/) is a distinct juvenile form many animals undergo before metamorphosis into adults.
      Animals with indirect development such as insects, amphibians, or cnidarians typically have a larval phase of their life cycle.
      The larva's appearance is generally very different from the adult form (e.g. caterpillars and butterflies).
      A larva often has unique structures and organs that do not occur in the adult form, while their diet might be considerably different.
      Larvae are frequently adapted to environments separate from adults.
      For example, some larvae such as tadpoles live exclusively in aquatic environments, but can live outside water as adult frogs.
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      su`i`cid`al
      su:i'saidl
      adj causing, intending, or relating to suicide
      -
      He also did something very foolish and suicidal.
      I think I'm getting depressed, and I feel suicidal.
      I had became suicidal when the mood swing had hit rock bottom.
      Because of suicidal idealations I began to call the VA Suicide Hotline.
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      cres`cent
      'kresənt
      n[C] a curved shape that is wide in the middle and pointed at the ends, like the shape of the moon sometimes
      -
      In art and symbolism, a crescent is generally the shape produced when a circular disk has a segment of another circle removed from its edge, so that what remains is a shape enclosed by two circular arcs of different diameters which intersect at two points (usually in such a manner that the enclosed shape does not include the center of the original circle).
      In astronomy, a crescent is the shape of the lit side of a spherical body (most notably the Moon) that appears to be less than half illuminated by the Sun as seen by the viewer.
      The word crescent is derived etymologically from the present participle of the Latin verb crescere "to grow", thus meaning "waxing" or "increasing", and so was originally applied to the form of the waxing moon (luna crescens).
      In the 12th century the crescent and star were adopted by the Turks and since then the crescent has been a frequent symbol used by powerful Muslim empires such as the Ottomans and the Mughals.
      Crescent symbol on a mosque in Nakhchivan, Azerbaijan
      The Red Crescent is an organization in Muslim countries that helps people who are suffering, for example as a result of war, floods, or disease.
      The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is an international humanitarian movement.
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      bliss
      blis
      n[U] perfect happiness or enjoyment
      -
      Go forth and seek your wedded bliss (the happiness that comes when you are married).
      Here I am, living in domestic bliss with a man who still gives me tingles in my nether regions.
      I didn't have to get up till 11 - it was sheer bliss.
      Living in married bliss is better than living la vida loca.
      Bliss is the name of the default computer wallpaper of Microsoft's Windows XP operating system.
      It is an image of a rolling green hill and a blue sky with cumulus and cirrus clouds.
      The landscape depicted is in the Los Carneros American Viticultural Area of Sonoma County, California, United States.
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      ob`struc`tion
      əb'strʌkʃən
      n[UC] blockage, obstacle
      -
      They're going to operate on an obstruction in his colon.
      He was charged with obstruction of the police.
      Police can remove a vehicle that is causing an obstruction.
      Police charged Christian Kupiecki, 19, with arson and obstruction of justice.
      The Japan Coast Guard obtained the arrest warrant against Paul Watson, founder and president of the anti-whaling group, on suspicion of assault and obstruction of business.
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