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      quo`ta`tion
      kwəu'teiʃən
      n[C] words from a book etc that you mention when you are speaking or writing ¶ a statement of the current value of goods or stocks
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      Quotation marks are punctuation marks that are used in writing to show where speech or a quotation begins and ends. They are usually written or printed as "..." or, in Britain, `...'.
      "The dice giveth and the dice taketh away" is a play on the biblical quotation "The Lord giveth, and the Lord taketh away".
      Air quotes, also called "finger quotes" or "ersatz quotes" are virtual quotation marks formed in the air with one's fingers when speaking.
      When someone gives you a quotation, they tell you how much they will charge to do a particular piece of work.
      Ask the builder to give you a written quotation for the job.
      A company's quotation on the stock exchange is its registration on the stock exchange, which enables its shares to be officially listed and traded.
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      dys`func`tion
      disf'ʌŋkʃən
      n[CU] a problem or fault in a part of the body or a machine
      -
      Perhaps what Leonard is obliquely referring to is the occurrence of some sort of sexual dysfunction.
      Erectile dysfunction (ED) or impotence is sexual dysfunction characterized by the inability to develop or maintain an erection of the penis during sexual activity.
      You didn't get your part cut. And you didn't get your part cut. Yep, bunch of old guys rocking out in a band, all with erectile dysfunction, you didn't get your part cut!
      Actually it's, it's quite, you know, typical behavior when you have this kind of dysfunctional group dynamic.
      You know, this kind of co-dependent emotionally stunted, sitting in your stupid coffee house with your stupid big cups which, I'm sorry, might as well have nipples on them, and you're all like "Oh, define me! Define me! Love me, I need love!"
      Codependent relationships are a type of dysfunctional helping relationship where one person supports or enables another person's addiction, poor mental health, immaturity, irresponsibility, or under-achievement.
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      make`shift
      'meikʃift
      adj temporary and of low quality, but used because of a sudden need
      -
      The family live together in a makeshift shanty in urban Kenya.
      They set up a makeshift camp that would be their home for the next 12 days.
      The workers sat on the floor on makeshift seats of overturned buckets or busted CRT computer monitors.
      I use it as a makeshift bra. I prefer the headband than the bandages.
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      griev`ance
      'gri:vəns
      n[UC] a belief that you have been treated unfairly, or an unfair situation or event that affects and upsets you
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      An employee has a right to raise a personal grievance case under the Employment Relations Act 2000.
      You can not bring a personal grievance to the Authority more than three years after you raised the grievance with your employer.
      A copy will be sent to any individual against whom the grievance is being brought.
      A stupid woman with a sense of grievance is worse than an unchained devil.
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      ail`ment
      'eilmənt
      n[C] an illness that is not very serious, affliction
      -
      Do you understand that Stephanie's not here to treat your imaginary ailments?
      The prescription lasts as long as the ailment does.
      His mother is also sick in the hospital with a heart ailment.
      It decreases the danger of pelvic inflammatory ailment, anemia, ovarian and uterine cancer.
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      pre`oc`cu`pied
      pri`akjupaid
      adj absorbed in thought, engrossed
      -
      I'm sorry, I got a little preoccupied.
      Ross is now preoccupied with the spider, and forgets that Rachel is still using the swing.
      After all, if Israel is preoccupied with an invasion of Gaza, maybe it will not want to get involved in Syria, a client state of Iran's?
      I often find myself preoccupied with these subjects.
      Since Marcy knew that Barbara was so preoccupied with time, she arrived at least 2 or 3 minutes early for meetings.
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      crease
      kri:s
      n[C] a line made by pressing, folding, or wrinkling
      also a verb
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      Creases are lines that are made in cloth or paper when it is crushed or folded.
      She stood up,frowning at the creases in her silk dress.
      Her clothes were creased, as if she had slept in them.
      She smoothed the creases from her dress.
      She ironed a crease down the front of each trouser leg.
      If cloth or paper creases or if you crease it,lines form in it when it is crushed or folded.
      Creases in someone's skin are lines which form where their skin folds when they move.
      A crease pattern is an origami diagram that consists of all or most of the creases in the final model, rendered into one image.
      If cloth or paper creases or if you crease it, lines form in it when it is crushed or folded.
      His face creased with worry.
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      vi`su`al`ize
      'viʒuəlaiz
      v[T] imagine
      -
      You can visualize this by imagining a pair of axes drawn on a sheet of paper.
      He could visualize her throwing the phone across the room and falling back into her bed.
      This technique really helps me to visualize things.
      You should visualize yourself with a lean body and know in your mind that you can accomplish it.
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      ma`nure
      mə'nur
      n[U] excrement from animals, esp horses
      -
      Manure is organic matter, mostly derived from animal feces except in the case of green manure, which can be used as organic fertilizer in agriculture.
      In agriculture, green manure is created by leaving uprooted or mown crop parts to wither on a field so that they serve as a mulch and soil amendment.
      The plants used for green manure are often cover crops grown primarily for this purpose.
      Common forms of animal manure include farmyard manure (FYM) or farm slurry (liquid manure).
      Manure from different animals has different qualities and requires different application rates when used as fertilizer. For example horses, cattle, pigs, sheep, chickens, turkeys, rabbits, and guano from seabirds and bats all have different properties.
      Some people refer to human excreta as human manure, and the word "humanure" has also been used.
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      ven`geance
      'vendʒəns
      n[U] revenge
      -
      Revenge is a harmful action against a person or group in response to a grievance, be it real or perceived.
      It is also called payback, retribution, retaliation or vengeance; it may be characterized as a form of justice (not to be confused with retributive justice), an altruistic action which enforces societal or moral justice aside from the legal system.
      Both sides were locked in a cycle of violence and vengeance.
      The music started up again with a vengeance (=with great violence or force).
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      am`pli`fy
      'æmplifai
      v[T] make sth louder ¶ increase the size or effect of sth
      -
      Although the earliest guitars used in jazz were acoustic and acoustic guitars are still sometimes used in jazz, most jazz guitarists since the 1940s have performed on an electrically amplified guitar or electric guitar.
      I can't amplify this point enough.
      Both CIOs view social media as a means to amplify the value of people, resources, and intellectual property across their organization.
      It will amplify our advertising's reach and make it stickier.
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      taunt
      tɔ:nt
      v[T] try to make sb angry or upset by saying unkind things to them
      also a noun
      -
      Rachel holds the phone out and starts taunting Phoebe.
      Joey turns around to taunt him, but Chandler is in the doorway and Joey is facing the kitchen.
      Hello Mr. Opossum, enigma of the trees, upside-down denizen of the night, taunting gravity with...
      "Neener-neener" is an exclamation typically used to taunt, ridicule, or boast.
      Surprisingly, he did not face the bullying and taunts one would expect from the boys.
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      glam`or
      'glæmə
      n[U] the special excitement and attractiveness of a person, place or activity
      -
      Finally, we're off to the glitz and glamor of Hollywood for dinner at, that's right, the Hollywood Carney's, a hot dog stand in a different converted railroad dining car.
      The President and Mrs. Obama's Super Bowl guest list mixed glamor with politics.
      I love fashion, style and glamor.
      Glamour is a women's magazine published by Condé Nast Publications. Founded in 1939 in the United States, it was originally called Glamour of Hollywood.
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      fu`gi`tive
      'fju:dʒitiv
      n[C] sb who is trying to avoid being caught by the police
      adj escaping
      -
      A fugitive (or runaway) is a person who is fleeing from custody, whether it be from jail, a government arrest, government or non-government questioning, vigilante violence, or outraged private individuals.
      A fugitive from justice, also known as a wanted person, can either be a person convicted or accused of a crime, who is hiding from law enforcement in the state or taking refuge in a different country in order to avoid arrest in another country.
      Interpol is the international authority for the pursuit of trans-border fugitives.
      Europol is the European authority for the pursuit of fugitives who are on the run within Europe, and coordinates their search, while national authorities in the probable country of their stay coordinate their arrest.
      Well, if I'm going down, you guys are going down (Points at all of them) with me. (They all look at her.) Harboring a fugitive? That's one to three years minimum.
      Penny I'm not sure I'm comfortable harboring a fugitive from the 2311 North Los Robles Corporation.
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      fac`et
      'fæsit
      n[C] one of the flat sides of a cut jewel ¶ aspect
      -
      Facets are flat faces on geometric shapes.
      Gemstones commonly have facets cut into them in order to improve their appearance by allowing them to reflect light.
      Of the hundreds of facet arrangements that have been used, the most famous is probably the round brilliant cut, used for diamond and many colored gemstones.
      Almost every facet of our lives has been transformed by a smartphone.
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      pud`dle
      'pʌdl
      n[C] a small pool of liquid, esp rainwater
      -
      A puddle is a small accumulation of liquid, usually water, on a surface.
      A small puddle on a street, with a reflection of the Palace of Culture and Science in Warsaw, Poland
      Puddles commonly form during rain, and can cause problems for transport.
      Due to the angle of the road, puddles tend to be forced by gravity to gather on the edges of the road. This can cause splashing as cars drive through the puddles, which causes water to be sprayed onto pedestrians on the pavement.
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      quan`ti`fy
      'kwɔntifai
      v[T] measure or judge the size or amount of sth
      -
      Teaching is a hard thing to quantify.
      The third measure we use to quantify modification of the network structure is the number of nodes.
      This study quantifies the impact on Earth's two most important chemical cycles, carbon and nitrogen.
      Can any of the data be quantified? What is their particular nature? To what extent are they likely to contain credible information on a specific subject?
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      war`den
      'wɔ:dn
      n[C] sb responsible for supervising sth
      -
      Warden is the title given to or adopted by the head of some university colleges and other institutions.
      A prison warden is the chief administrative official of a prison.
      In fire fighting, there are also people designated as fire wardens.
      A street warden is someone who patrols the streets in order to aid the police at a community level.
      A parking enforcement officer or parking attendant or traffic warden and sometimes parking inspector is a member of a traffic control department or agency who issues tickets for parking violations.
      Air Raid Precautions (ARP) was an organisation in the United Kingdom set up as an aid in the prelude to the Second World War dedicated to the protection of civilians from the danger of air-raids.
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      par`a`chute
      'pærəʃu:t
      n[C] a device used to slow the motion of an object through an atmosphere by creating drag
      also a verb
      -
      Parachutes are usually made out of light, strong cloth, originally silk, now most commonly nylon.
      Depending on the situation, parachutes are used with a variety of loads, including people, food, equipment, space capsules, and bombs.
      An American paratrooper using an MC1-1C series "round" parachute
      RAF Typhoon using a parachute for braking after landing
      Most modern parachutes are self-inflating "ram-air" airfoils known as a parafoil that provide control of speed and direction similar to paragliders.
      Dear God! This parachute is a knapsack!
      He fell 41,000 ft. before opening his parachute.
      If a person parachutes into an organization or if they are parachuted into it, they are brought in suddenly in order to help it.
      The plan is to parachute into enemy territory.
      A golden parachute is an agreement to pay a large amount of money to a senior executive of a company if they are forced to leave.
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      lon`gev`it`y
      lan'dʒeviti
      n[U] long life
      -
      The word "longevity" is sometimes used as a synonym for "life expectancy" in demography - however, the term "longevity" is sometimes meant to refer only to especially long lived members of a population, whereas "life expectancy" is always defined statistically as the average number of years remaining at a given age.
      Longevity myths are traditions about long-lived people (generally supercentenarians), either as individuals or groups of people, and practices that have been believed to confer longevity, but for which scientific evidence does not support the ages claimed or the reasons for the claims.
      Longevity claims are unsubstantiated cases of asserted human longevity. Those asserting lifespans of 110 years or more are referred to as supercentenarians.
      Longevity insurance, insuring longevity, is an annuity contract designed to pay to the policyholder a benefit if he or she survives to a pre-established future age.
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      bou`quet
      bəu'kei
      n[C] a small cluster or arrangement of flowers ¶ the smell of a wine
      -
      A flower bouquet is a collection of flowers in a creative arrangement.
      A fruit bouquet is a fruit arrangement in the form of bouquet.
      Monica and Chandler's. Chandler enters with a bouquet of roses.
      Cut to Ross getting of an elevator carrying a bouquet of flowers and walking down the hall to Rachel's room.
      The term aroma may be further distinguished from bouquet which generally refers to the smells that arise from the chemical reactions of fermentation and aging of the wine.
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      my`thol`o`gy
      mi'θɔlədʒi
      n[UC] set of ancient myths ¶ a commonly believed but false idea
      -
      Cassandra, in Greek mythology, was the daughter of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy
      The Golden Fleece is an old story of Greek Mythology about a ram whose hair (also called fleece) was made of gold.
      Contrary to popular mythology the Pilgrims were no friends to the local Indians.
      Common mythology had it that the psychic and the psychotic lay close together and that some psychoses were spiritual emergencies in which the sufferer would experience an epiphany.
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      pu`ri`ty
      'pjuəriti
      n[U] the quality or state of being pure
      -
      Anyone who is born to an Armenian family, regardless of the purity of their bloodline, has the right to claim his or her place as part of this nation and no one should deny them that right.
      Korea is always influenced by the climate in China, and the purity of the air in China will affect the purity of the air in Korea.
      The aim was to reach a state of purity, through which they would be in direct relationship with God, unite with God, be annihilated in God, subsist in God, and then attest to the Oneness of God.
      The virgins hold lilies, normally a symbol of purity, but their red colour suggests passion and physical love.
      In her white dress, white underpants, white high-heel slingbacks, and white earrings, Marilyn is a vision in white, suggesting innocence and purity.
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      af`flict
      ə'flikt
      v[T] affect sb/sth in an unpleasant or harmful way
      -
      Severe drought has afflicted the countryside.
      A 2011 study concludes 165 million EU residents are afflicted with some form of mental illness.
      In 11 Indian states, four-fifths of the population are afflicted with anaemia.
      He is liable to be afflicted by two dangerous diseases.
      Compare "afflict" and "inflict".
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      rup`ture
      'rʌptʃə
      v[IT] break or burst, or make sth do this
      also a noun
      -
      The OB/GYN thought it had been ruptured for those 2 weeks.
      In Nigeria's Akwa Ibom State, an ExxonMobil pipeline ruptured on May 1 and spilled over a million gallons of oil.
      A freelance cameraman's appendix ruptured and by the time he was admitted to surgery, it was too late.
      Abdominal hernia is formerly referred to as "a rupture".
      Achilles tendon rupture is when the achilles tendon breaks.
      Rupture of the membranes is known colloquially as "breaking the water" or as one's "water breaking."
      If your waters have not broken, a procedure called an' Artificial Rupture of Membranes' or' ARM' may be recommended.
      If there is a rupture between people, relations between them get much worse or end completely.
      If someone or something ruptures relations between people, they damage them, causing them to become worse or to end.
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