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      in`nate
      i'neit
      adj possessed at birth, inborn
      -
      Yeah, it's his, uh, innate Alan-ness that we adore.
      As a Senior Account Manager, Diane has an innate ability to build solid relationships with candidates and clients.
      I have an incredible innate ability to get very lost absolutely anywhere.
      With my camera in hand and innate sense of curiousity, I'll be documenting my experience on the King Tutankhamen tour which will give me a taste of Egypt in 9 amazing days.
      I think it stems from my innate desire to please people.
      Unlike the innate immune system, with each infection the adaptive immune system develops highly specific protection against a multitude of bugs.
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      mel`low
      'meləu
      adj soft, sweet, juicy, and full-flavored because of ripeness
      also a verb
      -
      Mellow is used to describe things that have a pleasant, soft, rich color, usually red, orange, yellow, or brown.
      As the veggie matures it develops a more mellow flavour and different nutrients; a red pepper is much sweeter.
      A mellow sound or flavor is pleasant, smooth, and rich.
      The clarinet has a warm, mellow tone.
      Someone who is mellow is gentle and calm and does not criticize other people, because they have a lot of experience of life.
      If you feel mellow, you feel calm and relaxed, especially after drinking alcohol.
      If you mellow out, you become relaxed and calm.
      If wine mellows or is mellowed, its taste becomes smoother.
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      gal`va`nize
      'gælvənaiz
      v[T] stimulate or shock with an electric current
      -
      To galvanize someone means to cause them to take action, for example by making them feel very excited, afraid, or angry.
      I believe Mr. Erickson is attempting to galvanize the opposition to Romney by showing what will happen with a Romney candidacy.
      At first, the KKK is ineffective but one event galvanizes the whites: the death of Flora Cameron.
      The worldwide movement is galvanized by the Occupy Wall Street movement started last month.
      Obama gave several inspirational speeches that effectively galvanized students.
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      in`trude
      in'tru:d
      v[I] go into a place or situation in which you are not wanted or not expected to be
      -
      If someone intrudes into a place, they go there even though they are not allowed to be there.
      If you intrude into my home, or if you offer a credible threat of serious harm to me in a public venue, I am entitled to deal with the immediate threat by killing you on the spot.
      I'm not intruding, am I?
      If you say that someone is intruding into a particular place or situation, you mean that they are not wanted or welcome there.
      If something intrudes on your mood or your life, it disturbs it or has an unwanted effect on it.
      It's not cool to have a government intrude into every aspect of your life, under the guise of "help."
      Why did the Korean aircraft intruded on the Soviet Union airspace?
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      hu`mor`ous
      'hju:mərəs
      adj funny and enjoyable
      -
      The things women find humorous are quite different from the things men find humorous.
      The second reading - Questions and Answers - provides more background in a humorous way.
      It was a humorous look at life in America during its "Cold War" with the former Soviet Union.
      Some people have a natural gift for telling humorous stories.
      Compare hideous, hilarious, and humorous.
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      slug`gish
      'slʌgiʃ
      adj moving or reacting slowly
      -
      As you know, lizards, cold-blooded animals, lack the ability to sense temperature. But they do move more sluggishly when it's cold. So, lizard weathermen would say things like, bring a sweater, it's slow outside.
      They required quick reaction but his reflexes were sluggish.
      The bank's forecast also estimates sluggish economic growth from South Africa as well, with 2.9 percent growth in a nation that's typically a leader on the continent.
      Ice Age is a family friendly film that shows the adventures of a sloth named Sid, a mammoth named Manny and a few other animals when the earth was being flooded with glaciers.
      Holiday sales could be hurt by the sluggish pace of the U.S. economy, with more than 12 million workers still unemployed in the aftermath of the recession in 2008 and 2009.
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      sta`tion`a`ry
      'steiʃənəri
      adj not moving/chaning
      -
      There are two types of radar guns: Stationary and moving.
      A radar speed gun (also radar gun and speed gun) is a device used to measure the speed of moving objects.
      A stationary bicycle (also known as exercise bicycle, exercise bike, or exercycle) is a device with saddle, pedals, and some form of handlebars arranged as on a bicycle, but used as exercise equipment rather than transportation.
      Next to the treadmill, the stationary bike is also popular with around 30 million users.
      They all have a stationary phase (a solid, or a liquid supported on a solid) and a mobile phase (a liquid or a gas).
      Compare stationary and stationery.
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      en`vel`op
      in'veləp
      v[T] cover or wrap sb/sth up completely
      -
      The next wave of the economic crisis will soon envelop the United States, Japan and the rest of Europe.
      A war which threatened to envelop the world in flames has been averted.
      The man envelops himself in a mouldy smell.
      This activity veils everything, envelops everything, and casts a pall over everything with its thick and sticky cloud.
      A sudden, violent storm enveloped them, high waves filled the boat with water and the disciples were terrified.
      One thing led to another and before I knew it I was enveloped in a romantic relationship.
      Compare envelop, envelope, and wrap.
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      re`sil`i`ent
      ri'ziliənt
      adj able to quickly return to a previous good condition
      -
      Attempts to make social and economic systems more resilient and thus reduce the severity of climate impacts are known as adaptation.
      The 802.11 protocol is designed to be somewhat resilient to interference.
      The atmosphere is more resilient than we think and the earth-atmosphere system always creates balance.
      Resilient people celebrate what goes right rather than lamenting what goes wrong.
      Compare elastic and resilient.
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      cen`sure
      'senʃə
      n[U] strong criticism or disapproval
      also a verb
      -
      Lt. Gen. Philip Kensinger was censured by the army for lying to investigators about Tillman's death.
      What happens when the opposition moves a censure motion against a government minister?
      The supreme court may privately or publicly reprimand or censure, suspend, and remove judges.
      Any member censured by the Managing Committee may appeal to the General Body within sixty days and decision thereupon shall be considered final.
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      re`tard`ed
      ri'ta:did
      adj occurring or developing later than desired or expected, delayed
      -
      This test's purpose was to measure the intelligence of retarded children.
      The deaf children were treated as mentally retarded children because of ignorance of the villagers.
      You have to be the most retarded person on earth to believe that shit.
      Anyone who thinks Xbox is better is retarded.
      You have no right to call people ignorant, stupid or retarded, especially when you can't tell the difference between plain/plane and you're/your.
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      strong`hold
      'strɔŋhəuld
      n[C] a fortified place or a fortress ¶ a place or area where a particular belief or activity is common
      -
      Florida troops fired on the federal stronghold of Fort Pickens.
      Coming under attack on 25 June, the stronghold's defenders leveled heavy fire at the attackers from a number of pillboxes and artillery positions.
      The stronghold was his home; the things he loved and wished to protect were his family.
      Obama won the Democratic stronghold of Cleveland's Cuyahoga County, which has a black population of 30 percent.
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      in`stall`ment
      in'stɔ:lmənt
      n[C] a portion of sth
      -
      An instalment (or installment in American English) usually refers to either:
      A sum of money paid in small parts in a fixed period of time.
      A single payment within a staged payment plan of a loan or a hire purchase (installment plan).
      An episode in a television or radio series.
      An entry in a film series.
      Serial (literature), a publishing format under which a single large work is presented in contiguous successive publications.
      An installment plan is a way of buying goods gradually. You make regular payments to the seller until, after some time, you have paid the full price and the goods belong to you.
      It is the first of two films based on the novel Mockingjay, the final book in The Hunger Games trilogy, written by Suzanne Collins, and the third installment in The Hunger Games film series, produced by Nina Jacobson and Jon Kilik and distributed by Lionsgate.
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      pelt
      pelt
      n[C] the skin of an animal with the fur or hair still on it
      -
      Fur is also used to refer to animal pelts which have been processed into leather with the hair still attached.
      The manufacturing of fur clothing involves obtaining animal pelts where the hair is left on the animal's processed skin.
      In contrast, making leather involves removing the hair from the hide or pelt and using only the skin.
      Both English and French fur traders were soon selling beaver pelts in Europe at 20 times their original purchase price.
      The trade in beaver pelts proved so lucrative that the Hudson's Bay Company honoured the buck-toothed little animal by putting it on the shield of its coat of arms in 1678.
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      e`nam`el
      i'næməl
      n[CU] a hard shiny substance used for protecting or decorating glass, metal, or clay
      also a verb
      -
      Tooth enamel is one of the four major tissues that make up the tooth in humans and many other animals, including some species of fish.
      It makes up the normally visible part of the tooth, covering the crown.
      Vitreous enamel, also called porcelain enamel, is a material made by fusing powdered glass to a substrate by firing, usually between 750 and 850 °C (1,380 and 1,560 °F).
      The powder melts, flows, and then hardens to a smooth, durable vitreous coating on metal, or on glass or ceramics.
      The term "enamel" is most often restricted to work on metal, which is the subject of this article.
      Enameled glass is also called "painted".
      Fired enamelware is an integrated layered composite of glass and metal.
      Enamel paint is paint that air dries to a hard, usually glossy, finish, used for coating surfaces that are outdoors or otherwise subject to hard wear or variations in temperature; it should not be confused with decorated objects in "painted enamel", where vitreous enamel is applied with brushes and fired in a kiln.
      The name is something of a misnomer, as in reality, most commercially available enamel paints are significantly softer than either vitreous enamel or stoved synthetic resins, and are totally different in composition; vitreous enamel is applied as a powder or paste and then fired at high temperature.
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      rift
      rift
      n[C] crack or split
      -
      A rift is a crack or long narrow space that forms in a large mass of something such as rock or clouds.
      Rays may also shine through rifts and holes in clouds.
      Volcanic eruptions occur progressively along the rifts of the mid ocean ridges.
      A rift is a situation in which two people or groups have had a serious disagreement and begun to dislike and not trust each other.
      After founding Hogwarts and co-existing for years, a rift eventually began to grow between Slytherin and the other founders.
      Google is facing rifts between what's good for users and what's good for Google.
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      sen`su`al
      'senʃuəl
      adj expressing or suggesting physical, esp sexual, pleasure or satisfaction
      -
      Lust is the desire to experience physical, sensual pleasures (not just those which are sexual).
      Desire for physical pleasures is considered sinful because it causes us to ignore more important spiritual needs or commandments.
      Some people spend all their time gratifying their sensual desires, and there are some who practise self-mortification that does not help to develop concentration and tranquillity.
      Give your guy a sensual massage, and incorporate some items with diverse textures, such as a silk scarf, a feather.
      Harvest Thanksgiving is a sensual delight for all of our senses: sight, touch, smell, and taste.
      The way she spoke and acted was sensual but in an innocent way - she had a habit of locking eyes with whomever.
      Women, by comparison, start softly, with teasing and sensual sucking.
      His breath stalled at the sensual sweep of her lashes.
      Plump, pouting, crimson lips gleamed with sensual promises.
      Our sensual and emotional response to light is indeed as mysterious and varied as is our reaction to sounds.
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      per`sua`sion
      pə'sweiʒən
      n[U] a particular set of beliefs, esp religious
      -
      Persuasion is the process of persuading someone to do or believe something.
      After a few tense minutes of persuasion, they allowed me in without showing my ID.
      As a method of persuasion, I am not a big fan of PowerPoint presentations.
      If you are of a particular persuasion, you have a particular belief or set of beliefs.
      Academics of all persuasions have identified similar problems, despite differing in their views on the solution.
      "Of the ... persuasion" means of the type mentioned.
      The problem is that the rich and powerful of whatever persuasion, take a great deal out of the system for themselves but give very little back to those who have ultimately enrich them.
      Gentle persuasion is more effective than force.
      If you are of a particular persuasion, you have a particular belief or set of beliefs.
      The meeting is open to people of all political persuasions.
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      tri`um`phant
      trai'ʌmfənt
      adj showing pleasure and pride because of a victory or success ¶ victorious; conquering
      -
      Susan (Triumphantly) On your back... Mom.
      Joey (Triumphantly) The Unbearable Likeness of Bean!
      Ross (Triumphantly) I'm gonna be on TV!
      Monica glares triumphantly across the room, scaring Rachel who also stands up.
      Cut to the waiting room, a triumphant Frank rushes in.
      Sheldon triumphantly glances at Leonard, who is upset.
      You can say "Suck on that" when you feel triumphant.
      "So, how'd the lecture go?" "In a word, triumphant." "Really? Triumphant?" "Oh, yes, you should have seen those young people. Thirsty for knowledge, drinking in my wisdom. I may've changed a few lives today."
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      tu`lip
      'tju:lip
      n[C] a colorful flower shaped like a cup that grows on a long stem in spring
      -
      Tulips are spring-blooming perennials that grow from bulbs.
      Depending on the species, tulip plants can be between 4 inches (10 cm) and 28 inches (71 cm) high.
      The tulip's large flowers usually bloom on scapes with leaves in a rosette at ground level and a single flowering stalk arising from amongst the leaves.
      Tulip stems have few leaves.
      Tulip mania was a period in the Dutch Golden Age during which contract prices for bulbs of the recently introduced tulip reached extraordinarily high levels and then suddenly collapsed. At the peak of tulip mania, in March 1637, some single tulip bulbs sold for more than 10 times the annual income of a skilled craftsman.
      The Black Tulip is a historical novel written by Alexandre Dumas.
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      dag`ger
      'dægə
      n[C] a weapon like a very small sword
      -
      A dagger is a knife fighting weapon with a very sharp point designed or capable of being used as a thrusting or stabbing weapon.
      The design dates to human prehistory, and daggers have been used throughout human experience to the modern day in close combat confrontations.
      Many ancient cultures used adorned daggers in ritual and ceremonial purposes, a trend which continues to the present time in the form of art knives.
      The distinctive shape and historic usage of the dagger have made it iconic and symbolic.
      Daggers are a popular form of what is known as the "art knife", due in part to the symmetry of the blade.
      One of the most famous examples is knifemaker Buster Warenski's replication of the gold dagger found in Tutankhamun's tomb.
      Compare machete, penknife and pocket-knife.
      If you look daggers at someone, you look at them angrily.
      If two people are at daggers drawn, they are extremely angry with each other.
      A cloak-and-dagger activity is one which involves mystery and secrecy.
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      states`man
      'steitsmən
      n[C] an experienced political leader that many people respect
      -
      A statesman is usually a politician, diplomat or other notable public figure who has had a long and respected career at the national or international level.
      He is a true statesman and patriot.
      One ship is named Thomas S. Gates for a statesman who served as Secretary of the Navy and Secretary of Defense.
      All three of these statesmen were well known to the American public.
      Compare congressman and statesman.
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      ab`duct
      æb'dʌkt
      v[T] take sb away illegally
      -
      Kidnapping and abduction in layman's definition are just two interchangeable and similar terms pertaining to the same act or crime.
      However, there are a lot of confusions surrounding the two terms because of how each are used with regard to the separate individual jurisdictions around the world.
      In the English scope and Wales, abduction can mean the taking away of a child with the latter's consent even without the consent, knowledge or permission of the child's parents.
      Kidnapping may also refer to the taking away of a minor without his will.
      Others claim that the difference between the two is in the purpose.
      Taking somebody against his or her will without making known the intent of the abductor or only until the victim has been recovered is described as abduction.
      The abductor maintains a low key profile and may even keep the victim as a secret captive.
      Kidnapping, on the contrary, are more inclined to monetary objectives.
      The kidnapper also takes somebody against his or her will and holds the victim hostage.
      The victim will be an element for bargaining, negotiation, and or ransom.
      The company director was abducted from his car by terrorists.
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      re`coil
      ri'kɔil
      v[I] spring back, as upon firing ¶ move back because of fear or disgust ¶ refuse to accept an idea or principle
      also a noun
      -
      Recoil (often called knockback, kickback or simply kick) is the backward momentum of a gun when it is discharged.
      In technical terms, the recoil caused by the gun exactly balances the forward momentum of the projectile and exhaust gases (ejecta), according to Newton's third law.
      Bonnie comes down the stairs, as bald as Michael Jordan. The gang all recoil in shock and horror.
      The gang all recoil from the smell emanating from Joey, who fell in that big tub of worms at the bait stand.
      A hospital hallway, Chandler is sitting on a gurney with his hands spread out behind his back. Then Fat Monica comes and plops down on the gurney and one of his hands. Chandler immediately recoils in extreme pain.
      Ross opens the freezer and smells inside and recoils in disgust.
      You do? (Kurt raises his hand. Leonard recoils. Turns out he just want to scratch his head.)
      But you try one time to tell me who I should be sleeping with, and you and I are gonna go round and round the way we did when we were little. Remember? (Sheldon recoils)
      Remembering his father's sexual infidelities (resulting in at least three bastards), Wilde recoiled from the thought of sexual solace with other women, and Ross seems to have exploited his sexual hunger and refusal to betray his heterosexual bed.
      Compare recoil and flinch.
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      breath`tak`ing
      'breθteikiŋ
      adj very impressive, exciting, or surprising
      -
      Edge of the Bay studio rooms are very well appointed with the most breathtaking views we've ever seen.
      Saint Helena offers unique heritage and breathtaking views of nature from the highest peaks of the mountains overlooking the waters of the Atlantic.
      Marmot Basin is nestled in Jasper National Park which offers breathtaking scenery.
      If you're looking for a place with breathtaking beauty and virtually limitless choices for places to go and things to see, British Columbia is the place for you.
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