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      touch`ing
      'tʌtʃiŋ
      adj making you feel emotional or sympathetic
      prep concerning
      -
      Her story is the touching tale of a wife who stood by the husband she loved.
      The way she looked after her daughter was really touching.
      It was a touching story that moved many of us to tears.
      Everybody looked at me as I walked down the aisle. I found being on John's arm very touching.
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      un`flag`ging
      ʌn'flægiŋ
      adj continuing strongly and never becoming tired or weak
      -
      Then with unflagging energy she worked hard to convert those opportunities into making a name for herself that is the envy of every good actress.
      For her unflagging efforts, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 1991.
      Mr. Bharara expressed his "deep appreciation for the unflagging commitment, dedication and talent of the agents who so thoroughly investigated this case and the prosecutors who so ably tried it."
      She had shown unflagging support for the cause.
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      e`lec`tro`mag`ne`tis`m
      ilektrəu'mægnətizəm
      n[U] the science of magnetism and electrical currents
      -
      Electromagnetism is the study of the electromagnetic force which is a type of physical interaction that occurs between electrically charged particles.
      The electromagnetic force usually shows electromagnetic fields, such as electric fields, magnetic fields and light.
      The electromagnetic force is one of the four fundamental interactions in nature. The other three fundamental interactions are the strong interaction, the weak interaction, and gravitation.
      The word electromagnetism is a compound form of two Greek terms, ἢλεκτρον, ēlektron, "amber", and μαγνήτης, magnetic, from "magnítis líthos" (μαγνήτης λίθος), which means "magnesian stone", a type of iron ore.
      The science of electromagnetic phenomena is defined in terms of the electromagnetic force, sometimes called the Lorentz force, which includes both electricity and magnetism as elements of one phenomenon.
      An electromagnet is a magnet that consists of a piece of iron or steel surrounded by a coil. The metal becomes magnetic when an electric current is passed through the coil.
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      dex`ter`ous
      'dekstərəs
      adj skilful with one's hands ¶ skilfully performed
      -
      Opening will be the dexterous acoustic guitarist Steve Gunn.
      Progress through the game depends on active decision-making, rapid judgment, and dexterous co-ordination.
      Pique was less dexterous when confronted by the Portuguese attacker.
      Less intelligent and dexterous humans were wiped out by more intelligent toolmakers.
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      trac`ta`ble
      'træktəbəl
      adj easy to control or deal with
      -
      The male elephants are only tractable until they are about 15 years old or so.
      Bulls which had always been tractable suddenly turned savage.
      The issues have proved to be rather less tractable than expected.
      These researchers instead choose to address one of the more tractable problems.
      A simple system means one where the components are directly related in a tractable and serial causal chain.
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      giz`zard
      'gizəd
      n[C] the stomach of a chicken or other bird
      -
      The gizzard, also referred to as the ventriculus, gastric mill, and gigerium, is an organ found in the digestive tract of some animals, including archosaurs (dinosaurs, birds, pterosaurs, crocodiles and alligators), earthworms, some gastropods, some fish and some crustaceans.
      This specialized stomach constructed of thick muscular walls is used for grinding up food, often aided by particles of stone or grit.
      In certain insects and mollusks, the gizzard features chitinous plates or teeth.
      "Stick in one's craw/gizzard/throat" means to be difficult or impossible to accept.
      It sticks in my throat to have to accept charity from them.
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      an`ar`chis`m
      'ænəkizəm
      n[U] the political belief that there should be no government or laws
      -
      Anarchism is a political philosophy that advocates stateless societies often defined as self-governed voluntary institutions, but that several authors have defined as more specific institutions based on non-hierarchical free associations.
      Anarchism holds the state to be undesirable, unnecessary, or harmful.
      While anti-statism is central, anarchism entails opposing authority or hierarchical organisation in the conduct of human relations, including, but not limited to, the state system.
      As an anti-dogmatic philosophy, anarchism draws on many currents of thought and strategy.
      Anarchism does not offer a fixed body of doctrine from a single particular world view, instead fluxing and flowing as a philosophy.
      There are many types and traditions of anarchism, not all of which are mutually exclusive.
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      dep`re`cate
      'deprikeit
      v[T] express disapproval of
      -
      As a liberal and democrat I deprecate every idea in this book.
      Some folks thought when we'd acquire Sun Microsystems, we'd deprecate MySQL, but it's quite the opposite.
      In each new release, some interfaces are "deprecated", meaning that programmers are advised to stop using them.
      "What does that mean for programs written before the change?" "Most programs that use deprecated features will work for a while."
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      ab`struse
      əb'stru:s
      adj difficult to understand
      -
      I needed it to check certain abstruse points.
      Math is a mix of abstruse theory and detailed calculations.
      It's an abstruse philosophical essay.
      He was referring to an abstruse concept having to do with the dawn and twilight of creation.
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      com`mo`di`ous
      kə'məudiəs
      adj spacious, roomy
      -
      The third row is less commodious, but thanks to 14-cm seat travel up front, my five-foot-nine frame was fairly comfortable.
      I have a choice between a 200 sq ft apartment for $575/month and a more commodious one for $750.
      If cheap fuel, an abundant population, and a commodious sea-port, be the circumstances most favourable to the erection of manufactures, it may be asked, why have they not led to their establishment in the neighbourhood of Edinburgh, where these three conditions concur?
      The bath was very commodious with a bathtub and sliding door.
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      om`niv`o`rous
      ɔm'nivərəs
      adj eating both plants and animal flesh ¶ interested in everything, esp in all books
      -
      Pigs are omnivorous animals.
      It is omnivorous and the most terrestrial of lemurs.
      It is omnivorous, eating a wide range of insects and earthworms in the summer, and berries in the winter.
      It feeds mainly on bamboo, but is omnivorous and may also eat eggs, birds, insects, and small mammals.
      I am an omnivorous reader with a strangely retentive memory for trifles.
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      e`mo`tion`al`ism
      i'məuʃənəlizəm
      n[U] a tendency of showing too much emotion
      -
      You accuse others of "fantasy" and emotionalism, yet when you are faced with a rational point-by-point counter-argument you retreat into utopian abstractions and platitudes concerning wealth distribution and perfect systems.
      Although, from an early age, Martin Luther King resented religious emotionalism and questioned literal interpretations of scripture, he nevertheless greatly admired black social gospel proponents such as his father who saw the church as a instrument for improving the lives of African Americans.
      Whatever poetry was about it must eschew the wallowing in subjective emotionalism, the peeling away of the layers of skin surrounding the poet's psyche.
      This simply created a sentimental personal emotionalism of the sort exemplified above.
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      wind`ing
      waindiŋ
      adj a ~ road, river etc has a lot of bends in it
      -
      The river follows a winding and tortuous course.
      We climbed up a winding trail towards the village.
      There's a very long, winding path leading up to the house.
      An old car stuttered along the winding road.
      Compare serpentine and winding.
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      e`quiv`o`cate
      i'kwivəkeit
      v[I] avoid giving a clear or direct answer to a question
      -
      Did you go shopping with Julie? Don't equivocate with me; I want a straight answer to a straight question!
      Truth is truth, only devious people seek to equivocate it.
      He did not know how to equivocate or dissemble.
      She accused the minister of equivocating, claiming that he had deliberately avoided telling the public how bad the problem really was.
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      latch`key
      'lætʃki:
      n[C] the key for opening the lock of an outer door from the outside
      -
      If you refer to a child as a latchkey kid, you disapprove of the fact that they have to let themselves into their home when returning from school because their parents are out at work.
      Experts credit the economic boom, the cultural influence of America's growing Hispanic population and the entry into parenthood of a generation of latchkey kids.
      Information and materials are presented to aid in the development of an after school program for latchkey children.
      What a great way to keep latchkey kids busy and productive after school before their parents got home from work.
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      prov`i`dent
      'prɔvidənt
      adj having or showing wisdom for future needs, thrifty
      -
      She had learned a lot and was very wise and provident now.
      Scottish Provident is one of the leading providers of life, critical illness, income protection and unemployment cover.
      In Singapore, the Central Provident Fund (CPF; Chinese: 公积金) is a compulsory comprehensive savings plan for working Singaporeans and permanent residents primarily to fund their retirement, healthcare, and housing needs.
      Shanghai Provident Fund Management Center is an independent nonprofit institution directly subordinate to the municipal government.
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      love`lorn
      'lʌvlɔ:n
      adj sad because the person you love does not love you, lovesick
      -
      The album is not aimed at music connoisseurs but lovelorn adolescents.
      For lovelorn adults in New York, comedian Michelle Slonim is hosting an "anti-Valentine's Day show" at a Manhattan venue.
      It is for the lovelorn and the love-torn those who have been stomped out by love.
      There's also a huge police effort going into tracking unstable people, from lovelorn stalkers to political zealots.
      He's the lovelorn fool who wails and grovels beneath his hardhearted beloved's bedroom window.
      The Sorrows of Young Werther is an epistolary and loosely autobiographical novel by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, first published in 1774; a revised edition of the novel was published in 1787.
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      daunt`less
      'dɔ:ntləs
      adj resolute
      -
      A dauntless person is brave and confident and not easily frightened.
      In spite of the scale of the famine, the relief workers struggled on with dauntless optimism and commitment.
      The Douglas SBD Dauntless was a World War II American naval scout plane and dive bomber that was manufactured by Douglas Aircraft from 1940 through 1944.
      Operation Dauntless is part of Operation Courageous in the Korean War.
      USS Dauntless is a fictional starship in the Star Trek universe.
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      ava`ri`cious
      ævə'riʃəs
      adj immoderately desirous of wealth or gain, greedy
      -
      Brands are the 20th century version of avaricious colonists swapping beads for land with naive natives.
      Managers and their lawyers, investment bankers and accountants simply lied to investors for their own avaricious gain.
      Henrik is sure she was murdered and believes the killer is a member of his avaricious and secretive family.
      He is ambitious and avaricious.
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      joc`u`lar
      'dʒɔkjulə
      adj joking or humorous
      -
      The other is plump, friendly, jocular.
      Between songs, he played the emcee with jocular self-parody.
      At eighty-seven, he was still jocular and voluble.
      The conversation at times was jocular, mostly serious.
      Our jocular waiter sometimes crossed the line from friendly to familiar.
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      ful`mi`nate
      'fulmineit
      n[C] an explosive salt of fulminic acid
      v [IT] explode or detonate, or cause sth to do this ¶ criticize sb/sth angrily
      -
      Mercury fulminate is a primary explosive. It is highly sensitive to friction and shock and is mainly used as a trigger for other explosives in percussion caps and blasting caps.
      First used as a priming composition in small copper caps after the 1830s, mercury fulminate quickly replaced flints as a means to ignite black powder charges in muzzle-loading firearms.
      Mercury fulminate has the distinct advantage over potassium chlorate of being non-corrosive, but it is known to weaken with time.
      Today, mercury fulminate has been replaced in primers by more efficient chemical substances. These are non-corrosive, less toxic and more stable over time.
      Fulminates are chemical compounds which include the fulminate ion. The fulminate ion is a pseudohalic ion, acting like a halogen with its charge and reactivity.
      Due to the instability of the ion, fulminate salts are friction-sensitive explosives.
      But didn't he used to fulminate against the arms trade?
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      match`less
      'mætʃləs
      adj unparalleled
      -
      You can use matchless to emphasize that you think something is extremely good.
      There she stood before him, in all her matchless beauty.
      Congratulations to all the winners, who will each receive a bottle of matchless and marvellous Taittinger champagne.
      We recognize that every individual has dignity and matchless value.
      These fighting scenes are wrought with great artistry and matchless photography.
      Matchless, one of Britain's oldest motorcycle brands, is set to launch outerwear collections in June.
      He's gaining a matchless reputation as a portrait painter.
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      di`spen`sa`ble
      di'spensəbəl
      adj not necessary or essential
      -
      It seemed the soldiers were regarded as dispensable - their deaths just didn't matter.
      As a result, the practice of traditional management of treating employees as dispensable becomes counter-productive.
      The manufacture is a dispensable part of the value chain,however, it also impact negatively upon the environment.
      I feel little, lost, ugly, and dispensable.
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      spas`mod`ic
      spæz'mɔdik
      adj of or relating to a muscle spasm ¶ occurring or done at irregular intervals
      -
      In medicine a spasm is a sudden, involuntary contraction of a muscle, a group of muscles, or a hollow organ such as a heart, or a similarly sudden contraction of an orifice.
      It most commonly refers to a muscle cramp which is often accompanied by a sudden burst of pain, but is usually harmless and ceases after a few minutes.
      Both asthma and spasmodic coughs are respiratory problems.
      In whooping cough, there's a characteristic spasmodic cough followed by a whooping noise as the child draws in breath.
      The dog was eating something, jaws working in spasmodic gulps.
      There are spasmodic flashes of lightning in the distance.
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      thun`der`struck
      'θʌndəstrʌk
      adj very surprised or shocked
      -
      Rachel was thunderstruck when Joey presented her with an engagement ring.
      She sat thunderstruck, speechless and uncomprehending.
      Some three hundred thousand soldiers went at it that day, and Dunant was thunderstruck by the carnage of the combat.
      On a spring day in 1960, in his 48th year, Jerome Weidman was deliciously thunderstruck to hear he'd won it with Fiorello.
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      rash`ly
      ræʃli
      adv in a hasty and foolhardy manner
      -
      Mark Harris, Chief Executive of mortgage broker SPF Private Clients, accused lenders of acting rashly.
      Banks have brought trouble on themselves by lending rashly.
      Her former colleagues felt that she had rashly sacrificed her intellect for her family and motherhood.
      Given that half his people depend on food aid, this might seem rashly optimistic.
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      as`per`sion
      ə'spə:ʃən
      n[C] an unkind remark or an unfair judgment
      -
      Carrie felt this to contain, in some way , an aspersion upon her ability.
      No one is casting aspersions on you or your men, Captain.
      Aspersion, in a religious context, is the act of sprinkling with water, especially holy water.
      Aspersion is a method used in baptism as an alternative to immersion or affusion.
      The word is formed of the Latin aspergere, 'to sprinkle', of ad, 'to', and spargo, 'I scatter'.
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      pa`le`o`an`thro`pol`o`gy
      peiliouænθrə'pɔlədʒi
      n[U] the study of the origins and predecessors of the present human species
      -
      Paleoanthropology is the study of ancient humans as found in fossil hominid evidence such as petrifacted bones and footprints.
      Paleoanthropology combines the disciplines of paleontology and physical anthropology.
      The Zhoukoudian Project came into existence in the spring of 1927, and two years later, the Cenozoic Research Laboratory of the Geological Survey of China was formally established.
      Being the first institution of its kind, the Cenozoic Laboratory opened up new avenues for the study of paleogeology and paleontology in China.
      The Laboratory was the precursor of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Science, which took its modern form after 1949.
      He is founder of the Paleoanthropology Institute in Oakland, California. Thanks for joining us today.
      The announcement was made this week by paleoanthropologist Tim White of the University of California at Berkeley.
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